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The contention that Friday evening' s meet-' evcriln s ineet- Inp at the Albert Ran was a non-pa.??t" gath- ering flies in the face of every demonstrable fact, connected with it. Sir Alfred Mond, who is a member of Parliament bv the votes of Radicals — many of whom now acutely re- gret, that, they contributed to the result,— caused the meeting to be convened Mr. W. ,1, Crocker, the Swansea agent for the party, organised it on Radical lines every I speaker was a Radical, and one searches in vain among t.he long list of names of per- sow; on the platform for that of a single re- preventative of either the Conservative, the Labour, or Irish parties of the borough. i To suggest, therefore, that this was not a j Radical meeting is a manifest absurdity. The circumstance that the Conservatives are almost solid in their support of the prin- ciple of compulsory service for able-bodied young men during the continuance of the war was doubtless relied upon to overcome their repugnance for the present unsatisiac- tory representation of Swansea and make them appeal- as if accepting it. Tha.t. ob- ject was frustrated by the action of the Conservative Executive Committee, who, in its protest, had the support of all recognised local leaders of the party. Sir Alfred Mond docs not think any one of the leaders in the House of Commons would endorse the protest offered. That is a mere statement of belief which he is ItS free to make as others are t-o contradict. Il Swansea we are not con (.muted with a que/stion of party politics, but with ,a. per- sonality NA-itli- whom are associations peculiar to himself. We are being asked to fight the Germans in war, and German commercial, industrial influence and methuds iu pence, under the leadership of a. gentle man born to German parents. Ta that regard Sir Alfred Mond is unfortunate as a politician eager to be active when Great Britain is at war with the countrv of his immediate forefathers. But even if that incident stcod alone it. should disable liiin like Mr. Stianss. the f onservativ^ member for the Paddingtou Division, from hDxing a voice in determining the policv of this country during, and more, parti- cularly after the war. And for the same reason thul Germans would not tolerate Reichstag mcinbe?? of British origin, and have, indeed, interned men born of British fnb?cts in Germany, many of them witJionti even a know]ed? of the Engbh language. Sir Ab'red Mond is not entitled any more than those to be relieved at war time of the disabiHtie? a.tta.chin? t" the incident of 1 origin. 1]'Jt thÜ does not stand alone. Sir Alfred Mond, by his upeaki.)? and writing and bv the action of the journals and or?a.nisations ? which he could influence, was persistently associated with two distinct but closelv related influences. One operated to persuade the people of this country that they had nothing to fear from their good friends the Germans, and therefore had no occasion to make preparations for war— those who believed the latter was ooming were mere scaremongers. It is somewhat j curious to find him on Friday evening solemnly inviting the public, to imagine what would i>e their feelings if 50.000 Cerma.n troops landed at SkeHy— presumably the tramway terminus—when in 1910 he employed substantially the same idea of a local invasion to illustrate the utter absur- dity of an Anglo-German war. Tlie other rnovetvero.—in which his part- ner, Sir John Bruu.at-r, was the principal agency—aimed at tiijr her reducing the ar- maments of this eo i«try actually a few months before the outbreak, and there were men on the platform t Friday evening who co-operated with bin., the extent of adopt- ing a resolution in supf ft. Sir Alfred Mond repudiated the idea he ever belonged to the Small Navy Pe/fy—ard. technically, we believe he i. yast fi. d in the repudiation —but what positively o il he do to resist the departure from the G'» vd-ir scheme of war- ship construction wh; in tho opinion of the most competent 1 idges, p.i,i,y1 only the necessary mar.in safety? Il does not require a long memory to recall the recep- tion accorded Lord Cawdor by the local organ of Sir AiS.ed Mond when, in 1910, the former caiwe to Swansea to urge the imperative need of keeping up the strength of the Navy. The fact that the latter has risen superbly to the demands of this war should Dot permit us to forget that it has received the aid of the French. Rus- sian, Japanese and Italian, fleets. Whereas, the plan formulated .it PotscLam provided a naval trial of strength after France and Russia had been broken, and the Austro- German lfeets, with possibly that of Italy as well., would be raassed togother against o urs. Mr. T. P. Cook referred to our losses in France and Flanders because of an insuffi- ciency of men and munitions, and Mr. R. L. Sails urged the eommau-seiis'ible view that in military matters we should trust to great soldiers like Lord Kitchener—"and Lord Roberts also," he added at the sug- gestion of "a voice." But the British force which, but for its high efficiency and indo- mitable courage, Lad been entirely wiped out at MOnf;, would have been stronger, better gutined and munitioned if the electors had "trusted to great soldiers inr stead of listening to. civilians and allowing themselves to be swthed by assurances that tho German menace was a, mirage, a deiu- sion. The Army va-s reduced, batteries were disbanded, and money saved by depiet- ing the stores of ammunition. Sir Alfred Mond was a party t'i this fnny-fvr eYery penny then gained Wt: ace ladling ont thou- sands of pounds to-day-and did not offer a word of protest. How could consistently with the view that the Germans were a I peaceful people who' e main desire was to do business with us? I From many RadicAJ an d Labour members I. rrieli?1)eir, a.nd others who M?k part in the ?ecru]tiJ?g campaign since At.?uet, 1914, th? -h'.?nk admission in effect h.?-? come, We did not be.! Jieve Germany mean;, war, for we luiev no better." But Sir Alfred Mond stands in a, different pc?itio.n. He knew the German  pearle il)ti?-natp-lv 've 'alrly frequent visitor to the Teutonic Fatherland, fi-equplit V;"?itGr t,, and ?'utd hardly ha.n iVilod to detect the poi- iF(?on,ver,tjtt -,ri.th ],,ter-l.tiil.(?, ¡ ,,il,,) liai,(Jly ba%-t t,?) t],?! ,Olloii. atniQ-p b ere hatre,-l ,)f 1,rit is)i r ublici8tf:, and soldi54-* for ymn-s  producing. After the horse ha.d gone he announced the stable doer was open all the time. He said at Aberavon, when practically everybody realised it, that he knew that tho Germans had for years been, preparing for the world war. Why did he not in the same patriotic, spirit that fires him now diffuse Miat knowledge when it might have been helpful to us, instead of using his facilities iADr publicity to foil the efforts of those wh" clearly foresaw tho dan- ger and strove in vain to get adequate pre- parations made in time? He now says: "r caire not what, views a man expressed befoe the war broke out, or what views he wili express when the war e,(,,ase.r,but, foi, sake, let us all join to win the war: l,hH>]$ a convenient and evasive plausibilify—with a patriotic in- vocation tacked ■ n. In this way he would brush aside onsiderations of momen- tous importance. he, views before the war of a politician situ :ted as Sir Alfred Mond is. with the power of great wealth at his back, and with means, in-visible as well as visible, for influencing national policy, are not to be so light]/ disregarded. For they j have a close bear'ug on the present silua- tion, and are, unless kept in check, capable of having an effec. < n the terms of peace. In more than or' war the subterranean activities of politicians have stultified the sacrifices and victories of the soldiers in the fieid. The conviv Jon of those who refuse, | to admit—and th .y comprehend the over- I whelming majority of the electors—i" th&t the candidate w ho was elected lat-e in 1910! on issues that ha\c ceased to be relevant no j on lSi'Ue. that ha\ cea..sed to be reJevant no longer iepresents Swansea on the only ?ssue that now counts. j It the warning of Lord Roberts—the I great-est soldier produced by Britain since Wellington—had oeen heeded, there would have been no war, uecause the knowledge of the existence in tVs country of millions of partly trained mm would have restrained the Kaiser and bis entourage until they could make Mire that the British—capable in such circumstances of developing great military strength, ^qjplemcntiiur that of the I .N a yy--wouJd intx iteTvaae. If in cWpite of the )mowle(lge t :'e war had been decided upon at Potsdam it would have been over months ago. If in the spring of 1915 Great Britain had been a a position to place a couple of million r„ ri in the field there woul d have been no d<-i\e out of Galicia, so shattering to our Russian ally. But the warning and tho advice failed, of effect, because nit u like Lord Haldane and Alfred Mond. with, their special knowledge of Germany, assisted to lull the British into a false seuse of security. And this va-s not all. In London and in I the provinces a party was working openlv but witli greater power insidiously—for a pro-German policy. This aimed at the lye trayal of France a-nd Russia, and, if success- fully imposed oil the Government, would have meant a free hand for A-ustro-Geornianv to smash beyond repair France and disable R?i?ia for a tre?'a?ifm. L?.vi))? s.s the Riis-,I,i for Germany in o?,, the Channel porta in Blginn and France to confront Great llltaah without an effective friend in the wrld, and its Navy called upon to fight not only the massed forces of the Triple Alliance, but probably the bulk of the Rusian and French tleots,. secured as part payment of indemnities. It is almost incredible, but, nevertheless, an historical fact, that the British Cabinet came very near a decision which \j?ould have entailed this red ruin for Great Britain and the breaking up of tlie Empire. The issue in the balance fo" days. But the peril was tlie gravest experienced in this country for a hundred yea,re and more. What part did the Westminster Gazette" play during the crucial days a.nd h!)IIl ? It was frd with official news a.nd views from Belliu that the German Foreign Office designed to influence- the Birtish Gov- ernment a-rid i)tli) ic in the pro-German sense. The effort- failed, "If] Of tll,t we are engaged in a great war. not alone, but in at Foot of Next Column.)

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