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ABERAVON DISTRICT SHIRKERS.

MASSACRE OF AMERI- I CANS,.…

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I COMPULSION OR I POSSIBLE…

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COMPULSION OR I POSSIBLE DEFEAT. I I PREMIERS GHAVli APPEAL.. I ONLY THIRTY-NINE Ii OPPONENTS. The second reading of the Military Service Bill was carried in the House of Commons on Wednesday evening by a majority of 392, the figures being:— For the Second Reading. 431 Against 39 The debates on the Ifilit-axy Sen-ice Bill have pMduced from two or three old mem-I bers of the ?lloll,.e tll;i,t are likely to be remembered as among the most suc- cessful in their career. Those (says the Tiiiies Parliamentary correspondent) who had the good fortune to hear Mr Balfour last week and Sir Edward Carson on Wednesday may congratulate themselves upon having he-fird these statesmen at their very best. On Wednesday there was such another j experience, and Mr. Ellis Griffith, jn doing justice to his theme, has done justice to him- self as well. Irony and humour, the familiar weapons of Mr. Griffith, are effective enough 011 the ordinary Parliamentary occasions, but when a man is very muoh in earnest he ho- comes direct and plain, concise a.nd precise, ?nd no method of controversy is f'verap-! pMcmted more tha.n that by the 0;? Commons in its great moments. So it was both with Mr. Griffith and the House. One of his most effective passages was It had been said that a great many crimes j were committed in the name of liberty. A great many fallacies had been uttered in the debate in the name of liberty. (Tai-i gh ter.) The liberty hon. members talked about would mean anarchy and no State. To compel men to join Trade Unions was liberty, but to com- pel men to join the Army was treason. (TJlmd cheers. ) There followed a somewhat cynical can- I fession by Mr. Dillon that he would have continued his opposition to the Bill if only it had been opposed by half the Liberal party a.nd a solid and united Labour party. Sir John Simon was much milder in his second reading criticisms than he had been in hiis opposition to the introduction of the Bill, and he added very little that was new i to the arguments with which, from one quarter or another, the Bill ha.d already been assailed. He did, however, give the coun- tenance of his authority to the most insidious critiicsm expressed by M". Anderson—name- ly, that the provisions of the Bill might be used to institute industrial compulsion, The Prime Minister himself, who had como in during the speech, took the oppor- tunity of replying to the criticisms and ob- jections of his former colleague, and did not spare him. Like the House, he found i Sir John Simon to be academic and ap- I patently and iff event to. actualities. We are at war, he drily reminded tne ex-Home secretary, Mr. Asquith claimed agaiii that his pledge ] had preserved the voluntary system. But | his main point was that of military neces- Bity. "On behalf of the whole of my colleagues, I say to the lIonso and to the country," he declared, "that unless you poos this Bill we cannot do our part in the prosecution of this war." He repeated this intimation later in another .form—"Unlefefc the House will give 113 the opportunity of 1 fulfilling my pledge-I do not say it will ma.ke the difference between success and failure in the war, but I do say you will be disabling as front carrying out our obliga.- tions to the country and to our Allies." This was one of the three outstanding points [ in the Prime Minister's final appeal to the j House. The wond was his treatment of the criticism that the Bill threatened in- du.strial compulsion. As Sir John Simon knew, he said, nothing had been further from the intention of the fromers of the By.1 than that it should be used for such a purpose. But. to put the niatt-or beyond all doubt, the Government wit esneaered in Devising machinery and safeguards which would make the use of the Bill for such a purpose impossible. Mr. Asquith's third leading point was a gravo suggestion that the House should read the Bill a second time with general consent. He believed that there were both in the House and the country the conditions of general consent, and at this moment the House could not strike a. more effective blow at the enemy than by reading the Bill a second time without a division. The House of Commons is hardly ever quite silent, but during these last moving sentences of the Prime Minister's appeal the silence in the Chamber, save for his own voice, was abso- lute. MR. PRINCLE'S WITHDRAWAL. ( There was a definite and encouraging re- ?pt??lse to the appeal ,of the Pnme Minister at that after-dinner hour when the House I' of Commons g?tiiej? llf together a.gam for a contusion wory of the beginning m Lts day. At that particular hour the House, after pru?ntged lassitude, again becomes I Moy'-ded, animated, and expectant of big speeches or events. In a crowded Chamber. I with all the leading sta,temen for an audi Mict-, Mr. Pringle a.nnounMd the withdrawal of his opposition to the Bill, and the an- nouncement. suggesting as it did a with- drawal comprehending mote, than one vote, was vociferously welcomed by the House. As the hour ot adjournment approached it wps noticed that Mr. Arthur HenderM-n. the Minister for Education, sa.t on the Bury bench between the Pr-rne Minister and Mr. Bonar Law. and that he was taking notesf or. the honourable and responsible tusk of winding up the del ate for the Gov- ernment. Mr. Henderson had a magnificent audi- ence, and the speech was worthy of it and the occasion. To Mr. Henderson the choice j W.4A Between compulsion and possible defeat, j and lie spoke accordingly. VVe had to put forth all our resources and we had to en- courage our Allies, and these things we could only do by this limited measure of compulsion. He deuied that the Bill men- aced the privileges of labour, and claimed, indeed, that labour and democracy were bound' up with tthe cause which the Bill sought to serve. Mr. Asquith was deeply moved by a speech which was pitched to the ioftiest note of patriotism, and he patted Mr Henderson warmly upon the arm as the Labour leader resumed his seat. Mr. BonM' L?w, too, offcrfd cordial con- gratulations, and t?e whole Hou?e cheered *— T —

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WHEN CALAIS WAS IN DANGER.