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I I ISUVLA BAY FAILURE. I

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I ISUVLA BAY FAILURE. I "INERTIA" WHICH LOST THE CHANCE. I Sir Ian Hamilton's long awaited dispatch I on the Suvia Bay ventm'e in GalUpob La?t I August was issued. J t :s one 0{ the most m.rka ble doeumen sver p'-n!?d by ,i ?ritiBh commander, for it tells of an adventure that will form a fruit- till topi-c of controversy in the future, uses iangnage of superlati ve-, pi aise for the gloii- ous vaiour and devotion of soldiers who not I' many months ago were pursuing the ordinary vocations of peace, and places the blame for the failure in unequivocal Language upon Lieut.-General the Hon. Sir F. Stopford. It was General ctopford who v.-as in com- maud of the feth Corps at Suvia Bav. Speak- ing of what happened there on the event- luJ August 7 and 8, Sir Ian Hamilton scarcely makes any attempt to conceal his deep pa-in astonishment. The landing at night WM- snccessfully effected. The Turks had been taken wholly by surprise. But no one seemed, he says, to be present in the important hours of dawn to take. a hand two brigades, the 32nd and 34th. and launch them in a cohesive attack. General Hamilton compla.ins bitterly that he has failed in his endeavours to get "some live human, detail" about the ?'ht!ng. I -e ? .71iii ?bil d,3t,&, ,Iabfut t-l-,e j'igbt?ng. Serious lack of water, despite th.? tiiahor?f preparations, added concider?b?y to the exhaustion of the men. General 8tpfl)rd urged his Divisional Com- manders to push on, but they replied that the men were toe much done up. Sir Ian Hamilton, however, points out that it. was overlooked that the Turks were also thoroughly exna.upted, and disorganised in addition. General Stopford had informed his officers that he did not wish them to make frontal attaci.cs, and Sir li-n remarks 1 trenchantlv Within the terms of this-instruction1 lies the root of our failure to make use of the priceless daylight hours of August 8. Driving power was required. The prse fatai error was inertia, and inertia prevailed. So serious a view of the situation did General Hamilton take when he received his reports that he left his headquarters a.t Irnbros. went. to Suvia, and took matters in hand himself. It was too la1.A. The Turks, suspooling what, had happened, took fullest advantage of the delay by bringing up rein- forcements and rallying, and when our attack was launched it was impossible for it to sue- ceed. The senior commanders at Suvia, Sir Ian declares, liad no personal experience of trench warfare and the method of the Turks. Strong personal leadership had not been promptly enougn appiiea. Yet success had se-et-ned aJmost in sight at one period. As was already known, some of our troops gained the heights of Chunuk Bair and looked down upon the N arrows and upon the Asiatic shore of the Dardanelles. They were the 8th Lancashire? and Gurkhas who thus viewed the promised land, but they were forced backward. Their tail ure to maintain the success they had achieved was due to a few minutes' un fortunate delay on the part of General Baldwin who. in the dark, had encountered exceptional difficulties, and had lost his way. Some extraordinary thiags happened in the series cf great battle.. A number of fine fellows recruited on the King's Sandringham Estate Charged into a dense wood, and not a single man returned. At one place the Wiltshire were "almost annihilated," everywhere the men fought themselves to a standstill, and Generals fought in the ranks side by aide with their men, who threw down their sciei-itific weawns aaid seized the Turks by the throat. General Hamilton is moved to enthusiasm by thp bravery of mi4 trucps--hc-. does not forget to praise the Turks too for tieir Ln- domitable spirit and courage—and he says extraordinary things of the New Army, who acquitted themselves like veteran cam- paigners even when they were left entirely without officers. It is impossible to read the dispatch with- nut, a. t.hrill The deeds of our soldiers, among whom the Anz.ics—superman they are termed—again proved themselves worthy to be classed with the finest fighters that ever lived; and Germany will fool green with envv at the amazing completeness of the pra- liminaxt plans which worked so successfully j that for three days an army was landed and concealed under the very eyes of the enemv. But the dispatch ends sadly. Serious &icfc | ness broke out. General Hamilton asked fo. 60,000 reinforcements, but was told he cot! ld not have them in such terms that it was im possible to insist in his demand. He did the best he could in a second attack, but had to contend against s h eer bad luck in weatiler and the improved moral of the Turks. His I Yeomen behaved superbly in this attack, proving the worth of the New Army again. Then an Oct. 11 he was astonished to re- ceive a cable asking him for an estimate of the losses tha.t would be entailed in evacua- ting the peninsula. He replied that such a project was unthinkable. On the 16th he was recalled, and his parting words to the gallant troops he commanded a.i e such as will make all Englishmen thrill with pride lor their achievements, their spirit, their cheer- fulness, and their faith. I "ROOT OF THE FAILURE.' THE FATAL SHORTAGE OF WATER. The part of the dispatch dealing wiih the "root of the blame" is as follows:— The weather was very hot, and the new troops suffered mucil tiom want of water. The Corps Commander reports that there was no time to develop the resources. Partly this seenis to have been owing to the enemy 's ftre; partly to a want of that nous which stands by as seoond nature to the old campaigner; partly it was inevit- able. Anyway, for as long as such a st.1.te of things lasted, the troops became depen- dent OIL the lighters and upon the water brought to the beaches in tins. Cndoubtediy the distribution of this water to the advancing troops was a matter of great difficulty. Judging merely by re- sults, I 1 egret to say that the measures actually taken proved to be inadequate, and that suffering and disorganisation ensued. The disemoaikation of artillery horses was 1 therefore at once, and rightly, postponed Ly the C01 ps-C-onimandei, in order that mules micrht be landed I-U To carry uo water. And now General ;>topford, recollecting t.he vast issues which hung upon his cess in forestalling the enemy, urged his Diviz,;mal Commanders to lyLiFli on. Other- wise, as he saw, a.U the advantages of the burn-rise landing must be nullified. But the Divisional Commanders b&Jievd themselves, it seems, to be uiiable to move. Their men, they said, were exhausted by their efforts of the night of the 6th-7th and by the action of the 7th. The wamt of water had told on the new troops. The distribu- tion from the beaches had not worked smoothly. In ?ome ca.sM the ho? h?d been pierced by individuals wishing to nil their own bottles in others il;, zht, d grounded | so far from the btkarb that men swam out to fill batches of water-bottles. All this ha.d added to the disorgiuiisation inevitable after a night landing, followed | by tights here and there with an enemy j scattered over a country tc us unknown. I These pleas far delay were perfectly well founded. But it seems to have bean over- looked that, the half-defeated Turks in front of Ut; were equally exhausted and digorgaai- ised, and that aID advance was the simplest and swiftest method of Solving the water trouble and every other sort of trouble: Be this as it may. the objections overbore the Corps Commander's resolution. He had now got ashore three batteries (two of them mountain batteries, and the great guns of the ships were ready to speak at his re- quest. But it was lack of artillery support which finally decided him to acquiesce in a policy of going low which, by the time it reached the troops, became translated into a period "f inaction.

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