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T. WELSH MINERS EXECUTIVE.

.POPULAR YOUNG LADY.I

I BRITISH SUBMARINE ISUNK…

SWANSEA ELECTRICITY WORK.

A -GENERAL -ELECTION?

I WITNESS ABSENT. !

A DIFFERENCE WORTH SAVING,

. IALL IN KHAKI BY NOW.

I IGIFT FROM THE STATES.

STATIONERY COSTS YOU MORE.

-IPREFERENCE FOR i Å LLIES,

————————— I I. " UNTI__1917."…

I THE REAL HONOURS. !

" WEEK'S WAGES." j 1

I IN THE WEE SMALL I HOURS..j

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IN THE WEE SMALL I HOURS..j A CUP OF TEA FCil T CM MY. With a roar and a hiss of stream and a grinding, of the brakes, the train pulls up at the platform, at dead of mg-ht. A .>old.ier huddled uij in a cornea- of a compartmesiti' stirs, yawns, sketches himself, and reluct- antly descends cn the windy platform. He is cold, jaded, cx?.%iped with many hours' travelling. His vitality is at its lowest ebb. He is half asleieip, hungry, and there is nothing for him but. boors of tedious wait- ing in the raw, bitter cold of midnight, or the small hours. To such a man the iight, th.e warmth, and the comfort of the Y. M.C.A. buffet—located at Swansea off the arrival platform at, Hitgh-sti^et—-is a God- fJffild. It is a little haven from the dark- ness, the chill, and the lonely desolation of a. God-forsaken British railway et-a.tion at two o'clock in true morning. In it there Mazes n ruddv. crackling tire. The warm buff walls, the burnished copper urn with I the damp tea cloths steaming on it. and the blue gas flare beneath it, the rows of burnished crockery, the glass dishes of meat pies and f.mdiwicha- the jars of lfowers, the soft stell comfort, compan- ionship, ease-, and refreshment, A cup of fresh tea (aind the tea a.t the buffet is as good 3.s any man needs to drink) a-nd a. solid stomach^-staying pandwich. a sm<~>k £ and a chat mean the world of difference. There is the physical relaxation a-nd revival; and there is the that warms the heart, that there ere people who care and think for him, and speed him on his way- "Ves. tihie hnffpft a firw-lftptritr? Cuests at all Hour- Its gaa-rison (on the night in particular of which the writer tells) comprised three V.T.C. men, in grey-green and scarlet bras- sard. anxious to see service if it be but domestic ttorvice and to join in a fight, if it be but a tea-fight. In their little oasi of amber light and warmth they awaited tlieir guests. These dribbled in a.t all hours. A navy man journeying from the Orkneys clos- fessed that he had bad, nothing to eat since leaving Newcastle doubtless he could have got it had he known the ropes, but men have sometimes too little time to inquire. Another visitor Hew in at midnight from a west oountrv port; a.nd went back again four hours later, having in the meantime kissed bi? people g<tod bye in a SWaŒl suburb. A Redate old campaigner well on the road to sixty years of age brought in a of a g e bi-c-tight iu a harem of women and children along with him to see hifh off.. He was an hour and a half too previous, for his train was late; but he accented it with composure. The Officer. An officer, limping on one foot, provided a strangely interesting study. With grave courtesy he declined all offers of service, save a seat by the fire. Cigarettes were, preferred. Keep them for the men they need them," he replied. (Oiie imagines that this was a man who would be followed into the tightest of corners.) He was communi- cative, and began to talk and as one lis- tened to his voice, the dull, fiat tone. spirit- IlesA, except for an occasional petulance, one realised the strain of war on a man of edu-. cation and refinement ac a volume of writ-1 ing could not have explained it. He seemed spiritually wearied, listless, dejected. Strik- ing the fire with his cane. he insisted, again and again, that there was no romance in the war at all it was the same dull job day after day. week after week, month after month. He relapsed into silence and gaz<ed | moodily into the fire. It was a silence one did not care to break in upon. Presently he limped out, ard with him went a breath from the battlefield. Before our eyes we had seen something of the reaction of months of tension, anxiety, vigilance, sleeplessness, responsibility, hourly presence with death. He had told us how he was wounded he said little; a brief allusion, musingly, a. fleeting glance into a dant yast of pain and, stress. The Tommy. -I Hours latex a party of soldiers twenty- four hours from the trenches clattered in, burdened with their packs, one with a goat- skin like Robinson Crusoe, another in a buff jerkin that might have been taken off a bowman of Grecy. their boots and puttees white with mud, their khaki fakled tc a dingy dun colour, and their clothes and kit stained, creased and crumpled. Over the steaming tea they chattered freely over their experiences. They were a world of a contrast to the officer, keen, animated, in- terested in their in ierchange of experiences, Yet, one would have said, they had been but iittile moved by that through which they had passed. What had for the moment darkened the officer's soul had passed quite above them. But they were men of coarser fibre, more robust, less intellectual. And one would have sworn, too, that in a dis- r.n.wa.on of tnA trifles that interest their class "&1'6' —football, for example—there wo-Id have been the note of a deep and zealous contro- versy that was never heard in their chatter about their part in the most awful war in liumac history. Much of whit they said was made up of the commonplaces with which we are all familiar—they inked of "pip squeaks" and "whizz bangs," one man praised the Saxons, another told how tho Prussian Guard dogged the Canadians, 'another asked about chums of his who were said to have gone up to a German trench and opened an informal, pre-Christmas truce. Cheery, imperturbable, obviou&ly completely unaffected by thair trials, they illustrated the virile strength and solidity of the rank and file. The night had drawn to a close by the time of their coming the chill blue light of dawn shone in at the window, the horizon lightened and warmed to orange and day came suddenly, with its crud.6 raw early sun. light. Out into the street* they clattered— grey, burdened figures, strange in their fur and leather jackets, their weather dulled equipment, their stubby rifle*. They left behind them a memory of rude health, cheeri- ness, a stolidity, calmness, and even good temper that were proof against the terrors and trials of war. "The nation with the best nerves will win," say the Germans. In the buffet that i night one saw much that would have made the enemy grave and thoughtful.

LION CHARGES A .TRENCH. I-.-.-

ABERAVON SUNDAY TRADING. !…

I I ISUVLA BAY FAILURE. I

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