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T. WELSH MINERS EXECUTIVE.

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. IALL IN KHAKI BY NOW.

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I ALL IN KHAKI BY NOW. DEBATE ON COMPULSION BILL. A fine robust speech from Mr. Duke started the debate in the Commons on Thursday (sa.ys the "Da.ily Mail" Parlia- mentary correspondent). He pharply chal- lenged those who had a.rgued that this Com- pujsion Bil- would split the unity of the country. "These ?ho ?re not wi?i WI are agaiinst. us." lie exclaimed. "Those who are not going to help the Government are going to help the enemy." Tho Ko-Compulsionists protested, but Mr. Duko pursued them relentlessly. "Then what a.re they going to do?" he demanded, and was only m&t with cries of "Old Bai- ley." Sir John Simon's figures were exam- ined keenly, and Mr. Duke rebuked bis old colleague at the Bar for "making a showy argument founded upon the use of isolated figures" and ignoring the effect of the figures as a whole. But the handling Sir John received im. this speech was mild in contract with the rrcea sure meted out to I -,in Lv his late Cabinet confrere, Mr. Herbert, Samuel. "My right hon friend s figures do not bear a. moment's consideration,' said Mr. Samuel, who is an acknowledged master of statistics. The bluntness of the remark Ather startled the House, and Sir John was hurriedly fetched in for his statistical funeral. Mr. Samuel Steadily and remorselessly I battered down Sir John's harriers ofreruge. No one was able afterwards to set Humpty Dumpty on the wall again, though Mr. Leif tried hi hardest, in the succeeding speech Even Mr, J, M. Robert.san. the cold, precise logiciaji. daserted him. He admired some of his arguments, but showed them to bp far from flawless, and supported the Bill. Mr. Percy Alden prophesied strikes and an inconclusive peace if the Bill parsed, bas- ing his opinions on the attitude of the work- ing classes, which he lamented that he could not. explain. A refreshing enti&te to these dolours W1U5! ftu'nixh?d by Colonel John Ward. H? used to be known as The Navv!es' M.P," Now he is their coloeiel. and a fine figure of I a soldier he made. Members flocked in to hear him. They stood three deep b?hmd the bar. He sha-tter?d the claim or the pre sent Trade Um,on Congj?ess to speak for organised 1,%bour, showing that a third to a haJf of the members of trade unions were in the trenches. In words of reaJ eloquence he reminded ns of the advantages we enjoyed from the "magnificent fact" of our island- isolation and claimed that this diid not lessen our responsibility towards those on the Con- tinent less fortunately situated in the fight for liberty. On the House of Commons lay the responsibility for bringing into line those whom he did not hesitate to describe as "sihirkers," and said he gave no mere grudg- ing support to the Bill. The speech was a tour de force and was loudly cheered. Mr. George Greenwood spoke steadily against the Bill, but declined to take the responsibility of voting against it. The view of Mr. Chancellor, a fellow-Liberal, was that the Bill would not hasten the end of the war. Then Mr. Hemmerde, one of the advanced young Liberal K.C. 's, surprised everybody Demanding conscription of the married I a.s well as the single. The voluntary sys- tem, he submitted, had yielded all the "real volunteers," and we had now no right to exploit the patriotism of those who could only come a.t groat personal sacrifice while j leavin g untouched those who chose to stay behina. I Colonel Ward's fine speech was later backed up by one of great fervour from i Mr. George Barnes, Labour member for I Glasgow, the new Privy Councillor. He l had come back from France the same morning only after a month's visit and [ his earnest declaration respecting the single men, We want tltese men," and his stories of his experiences made a great impression. The Prime Minister applauded him. I Mr. Balfour gave the positive assur- ance that there were no divisions of opinion in the Cabinet as to the absolute necessity of this Bill to the proper carry- ing on of the war. And why should the House trouble about the single men who had got no excuse, the only class affected by the Bill? There was no real division of opinion throughout the country. The division was then taken. The FiKu-es. For the Bill 403 Against 105 m ajorit-for 298

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