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THE UNKNOWN FACTOR.

GRANDSON OF SIR JNO.I LLEWELYN.

I MEMORIAL AT PORT ! EYNON.…

THE WATCH D'OG. I

COST OF PRINTING. I

I ! GERMAN COM-I MANDER IN…

IWRECK OFF 'COMBE.I

I ACCIDENT IN 1913. I

£8 WORTH OF MATCHES

I STOPPED -THE -TRAIN.I

IHORSE FEED FROM GLYN-NEATH.…

PEEPS INTO PAST AND FUTURE.

THE COFFEY COOLER.1

I COMPULSION BilL. ! — ___.…

HER CREW WAS THIRTEEN!

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HER CREW WAS THIRTEEN! [RESUMED INQUEST AT PORT TALBOT. The mquest was concluded at the Police Station, Jersey Marine, on Friday afternoon, before Mr. M. L. Thomas, on the body of George Harry (45), one of the three Port Eynon life boatmen drowned off the Gower ooast in the recent gale. Mr. F. Le BOll- ianger, the Mumbles and Port Eynon Life- boat secretary, and Lieut. Commander Mac- lean. R.N.R., (liatrict inspector of lifeboats, were present. George Eynon, the principal witness, who was not present the previous day, said he had no notice to attend the day before. The Coroner Two witnesses say you were advised to attend. The jury and the officers had to attend, and had it not have been he had not been very well he (the coroner) should have had something to say about it- Eynon said he had 38 years sea. experience, and was coaat patrolling at present. The disaster happened on New Year's Day. Wit- ness was called by the coxswain and asked if he would go with the crew to a vessel off the coast. The Coroner Are you one of the regular crew,No, Have you been in her before?—'Several times when I have been home from sea- How many were yrni when vou were ready ? -Thirtoe,n altogether, a-tl had oilskins and lifebelts qji- Was t-he boat aill right that day?—Yes. Proceeding, witness said they went out at 10.30 a.m., William Gibbs (aged 66) being the coxswain, who had had great experience, being enga-ged aJmost since ohildbood. They were trying to get at a steamer lying under- neath Pwlldu. "We raii up with a side wind till we got to Oxwiah Point. We went along quite comfortable, though there was a rough sea. running. The boat was going along nice and dry. At Dxwich Point we steered straight before the wind for the steamer (a.s Dunvcsan, of Glasgow). We got to the ship and let go the anchor about 400 yards before we got down to her. We hailed the steamer, and they did not answer. We R.k ed of they were in distress. Receiving no answer and finding she was* I Dragging her anchor, we picked up in order to oome round again. The Coroner: They had sent .signals to you, Witness They wanted a, tug from what I have heard. I did see. two men there. Any idea how long before you got to the ship from leaving Port Eynon ?- itness: About 46 minutes- N?7-hen ,ou i When you got back to the ship the second time did they say anything?—We could not get back, wind and sea being too heavy. We agreed then amongst ourselves we wodd go to the Mumbles. Proceeding, witness said; We proceeded under sail in the same way unts the sea capsized the boat. We were Turned upside down. One man went round in the boat. The boat righted again, and we all got back, except two missing (William Eynon and George Harry). The Coroner Did you do anything after righting the boat? Witness: We could see no signs of the two floating and we could do nothing. You went" then to the Mumbles?—Yes, with our oars. Ten minutes after we started again she oapsized again. Who took Eynon's place?—We got alonig as best we couM with our oars. It was a case of all pulliing and working. And within ten minutes you oapsized again?—Yes. It was another heavy sea, and William Gibbs was missed then. Wha.t happened afterwards? -We dropped anchor then and stayed there the nigiht until the morning (Sunday). We could do nothing. We had no lights, rockets, or amv thine. I Everything being washed away. How long did you stop there at anchor:— Until 7.30 on Sunday morning. You then got to the Mumbles?—-Yes. And all pretty well exhausted?—Yes, all exhausted. You know George ITArry?-Yos, ho.,w" my brother-in-law, and I lost a brother as well, I am sorry to say. As a matter of form was Harry perfectly sober?-—-Yes he was a man who never took anything. Everything was in orde: A—Everything. Wind and sea are the only things to account. for it. There is no neglect on anyone's part, at all. How long was it from the time you started to the time she first capsixed?—She capsized first about 3 o'clock or 3.30, and the second time about a quarter to four. By Mr. Le Boulanger lifeboat secretary) The boat righted herself. When Gibbs was lost witness took charge. The steamer's flags were flying but they looked black to him. A flag was flying half-mast. Mr. Boulanger: Was it her ensign? Witness I could not say. Why did the anchor drag?—The sand is soft and she was jumping. A great deal of praise is due to the witness for what he did. He kept his boat's head to sea dragging her anchor, added Mr. Le Boulanger. The men were exhausted and they had lost three hands By Lieut. Maclean The ground all round (by the ship) was not good nolding sand, lotherwis9 she would have held. You found she was dragging and you wanted to beat back to the stapjner.'—Yes, we had three reefs and a lug on. We were about a mile off the shore. The tide turned!- Yes; it was high 4a.,ter about one o'clock. We had to keep sail to keep her off the shore. You oould not carry more sail ?—No, she could not carry anv more sail. The Coroner How many men are there generally in the lifeboat' Witness Thirteen is the full complement. Were they all experienced men?— Y es, air. By a juryman The lifebelts would keep the men floating. Lieut. Mac loan said the lifebelts were guar- anteed to keep 281bs. afloat (a man's weight in the water) for 48 hours. > The Coroner said the facts were very short, and he was sorry that his first visit as coroner to Jersey Marine was associated with a disaster. He spoke in high nraise of the Heroism of the lifeboat men, men who were always ready to risk their lives to try and save others. Everything was in order and all the men were of experienoe. It was apparent that very heavy seae capsized the boat; it was one of the things that heroes were called upon to um,dergo under the circum:#ances. The only verdict they could return was, "Found drowned. The jury agreed. 'Lieut. Maclean said he expressed the deep sympathy of the Lifeboat Institution; he hid already expressed his sympathy with the relatives. After cwtferring with the men saved, the men behaved heroically. After each occasion there was no panic; whatever, and those getting in the boats helped the others. Each widow would get R,100 and each dependent child would get b25, and the institution would act, more generously if the money only allowed them to do it. Mr. Le Boulanger said in all probability weekly allowances would be made to the widows and the children until the latter reac h ed fb years of age. Two an-d a, boat hook belonging to the Port Eynon lifeboat have been picked up on the Swansea bca-oh. N ither of the ot.h^r two bodies has yet been recovered.

THE ccDAILY POST" . TOURNAMENT.

-Band of the " Pioneers,"

"VERY CREDITABLE THING."

SWANSEA SOLDIER- - j HUSBAND'S…

BROWN-WILLIAMS.,

MUMBLES LIFEBOAT I -MUMSLIFEBOATSLI;I'I

I COMPULSION BilL. ! — ___.…