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There Is this in justice to be vaid off 1".1 J. H. Thoma", noW engaged in protecting single men liaekets from being ?cfjmp?led to do what the manlier boys offered them- selves to do: he did assist in the final effort undertaken by Lord Derby to secure, under the voluntary system, the men for the Army and Na.vy indispensable to victory. At his Cardiff's meeting lie., in the most definite terms, dissociated himself entirely from men vvho opposed Conscription and' had done nothing to make the voluntary system a success. It must have somewhat jarred him therefore to have bis chairman at Swa,a- admitting at the very outset that he wH one of the&c. Mr. T h omas must realise that, whether he :lr, Thomaf' must reallso that. whether he likes it or not. be is becoming a?socinted with politicians who have been indifferent to their country's danger, or even been activelv iden-1 tied with movements reasonably calcula-ted to weaken Great Britain and her Allies, and to facilitate the success of the enemy, in addition to finding himself in the same I gallery as the unpatriotic in this oountrv. he a lso discovers from the comments of public- ists and presp that the propaganda, which he and others are promoting just now !.< en- j eo uragIIlg the Germans. Austrian* a nd I Turks, whilst puzzling and disheartening our, j Allies, will not- his common sense suggest j reconsideration of the part lie plavs. as one who wishes the war to be prosecuted on our side with the greatest vigour? The activities of Mr. J. H. Thomas have so far been, compounded of patnt:(' cn d ea- vour and most unpatriotic nuscliicf-makm? With a plea for national unity on his lips he spends hi? time and uses his position ')? M.P. and secretary of a. great Trades Uni<?- f ist organisation to incite class feelin?. 1?0- dnc? a cleavage in t.hge Is!aud?. whe? ?t ) tbe front ch?ss distmctMns hare disappeared because of a, common d?iger. a common sacrifice, and the sen?p of camara- dcrie which infects all ranks. Every E'wd soldier back from the firing ]u? A?H'tPtI you hoAv splendid the officer's are, and the latter in a thousand different ways testih to their recognition of the trutl; that no I such rank and file have ever before taken part in a British war. A learned judge declared long dkp-l) thot he never had a. litigant. before him who said that he acted in a certain matter on prin- ciple without realising that the facts would show that the action was foolish a.nd un, reasonable. Air. Thomas objects to national service an principle. What prmciple? The word itself has no value except when con- sidered in relation to the facts. A man may on principle refuse to shave, consort with red-haired men, or take off ids hat to a lady. "Principk" may connote the most absurd things. In this instance the princi- ple is presumably that he objects to military service under compulsion, even when with- out. it every liberty Ave value in this country may be extinguished. and if not now. but later these Islands may be devastated like Belgium, Nortli France, and. Serbia, their manhood put to the wnd, the women folk outraged, and the children massacred. But the princip? of comp?)?, is an e?ential pM-t of tra?s Unwn?srn. Where material compulsion is not a\ ailab'Ie. moral comp??i-iopn ? employed. Pre??ur'p ia brought to hear upon the h wlœn: in a variety of ways, and th ? J?st.i6ca?jo. i.n- variably offered is that the latter have no I right to enjoy the hem-tits won by Trades Unionism wit,hout contributing to the main- tenance of the latter. But, according t" the reasoning of Mr..1, H. Thomas and his friends, the com??bor\' J>rindp1e is rightLy applicable where wa?'-? and the conditions ()r labour are cohcernol, but not WhNt tha existence of a.n Empire, the most ?e!)ero)? e-x?ir,t,etic,e of an Em FA re. the -?nost. 11 freedom-(giving civilisation that the world I iha? ever k nown. an d th? jndependieinoe of the people of Britain and the liYN: of t.1: women and children are in jeopardv. Mr. j Thomas, though a patriot, draws tiie line, herp. Let these peri"hthe precion!; principle must, at all costs be presei,eid-,Q§o that able- bodied young men D,y I-ive, in ease and comfort <1i, home, relying like the women- folk upon the possibl.tjvy that the real men of the Empire in the trenches and the firing line will win through, off disaster and an invasion, ami achfe-ve such success by sacrifice as to avert tbe feeble peace, which would mean the resumption of the war a. fr' Yf>:U-S' heJlc, Wl:tvl1 'cc)'ma.ny has been g.i,eJl timc> to pliii a more formidable oom- • ibinatkwi to destroy the British Empire. The campaign for the TSemfit of the sh i rkers --these were sti ini,,l y represented at the Elysium on Sunday afternoon—if suc- cessfully engineered, involve the stoppage of reinforcements to the battle-line in adequate numbers, and consequently there will be ejiionnters in which our lads, as at Mons, will be outn.urpbered, and the war NA- LI, at the, best he prolonged at a heav y cost- in lives and money. No man or woman, with a son, brother, friend at the front. who thinks the matter out can fail to realise that the chance ot safety for those they hold dear v- ili be bettered to the extent that mor' men and rrni.uitions are sent out. and wo. ?>eaed if they are left with depleted battalions to face the most ruthless and formidable enemy known in the annals of war.. Mr. Thomas hoped, and so did we, that enough A olunteers could be induced to offer themselves, and, like him, did everything possibm to effect that oiid. "A good long pull and a. pull together, might enable the voluntary system to yield the necessary recruits. After sixteen months of trying by every imaginable device, foster, advertisement, and speech—which. had so utterly failed to keep up tlv strength of the bri- gades at the front L;,at amie. had not the e qui.va-lent of battalion strength—the Derby scheme was launched a.s the last desperate j effort" Aa the genuine supporter.,3 of the voluntary system and of a system of national service as advocated by the late F!: i rl Roberts-—scoffed at by the Haldanes and he like because of efforts as an ex- peri enoerl and far-seeing soldieu- to awaken tills country to thy reality of it, laboured to make a .success of it. The slackers had weeks time for rcfl.ec.t;on- few of them are illitei-ate -and in most areas werf) personally canvassed. The married men attested on a lAcfiwito pledge that the unmarried would be first oa-lted up—as they should be. The Gorornnient in honoar I)o,ir,(t tft redeem the pledge ii,;id msist on the abie- bodied bachelors taking their share of the I' national burden. Th: alternative advocated by Mr. J. H. Thomas and approved by a. majority obviously unfajniliar with the facts I is that the larger number of the attested — over a million of mar- ried men shall be released from their attestation oath on the off chance that, the determined or indifferent single men slackers, who have resisted every pi-esh-ure and inducement to piay the manly part, will roll up a.nd make up for the loss of the mairied men who have attested. This excessive solicitude for the least worthy element in the nation is unpardon- able, and the watering of the Compulsion Bill Is only the latest manifestation of the weakness of a Government accepting guid- ance from Mr. Asquitli. The vacillation and delays at critical stages due to Ow" wait a.nd see policy have been the despair of our Allies. The injudicious interposition of the North- cliffo Press has gravely prejudiced the case I for national service. Every newspaper form- ing part oJ the "Cocoa Pres;—a source of great national weakness for a decade and more-and the variegated elements doing enemy's work in this country, now adopt the trick of bracket-ting --with the view of dis- crediting—;i,li independent journals with the "Times" and "Daily Mail." Mr. J. H. Thomas did this on Sunday when he sug- gested--and the subterfuge was unworthy of any man occupying a responsible position— that there was a Northcfiffe Press at Swan- sea. If the allusion was meant for the i "Daily Post" it ghot very wide of the mark. Tbe Northcliffe area of influence^ is well- defined. It. does ik>t embrace the "Dil Post," which year atfter year dwelt on the | reality of the German menace, and the im- perative need of preparedness. This was so I conspicuously visibio that, the wonder is the I politicians at. Westminster cutting down armaments, demobilising batteries, dispersing battalions, and taking credit for substantial reductions in the expenditure on munit ions, failed to perceive it. The only rational ex- planation is tliat they were so fully absorbed in pari v-an struggles that they had no eves I for external perils. Mr. J. H. Thoniais, Who. in respect oi the military requirements oi the British, com- placently pits his views against those of the Government and Lord Kitchener, assumes that conscription is repugnant- at times of national stress to this or any other Democratic country. All our great wars—in the Crimea only a relatively small force Avas employed— have been won by mcan" of pressed men. Lin- coln subjugated the Southern States and re- deemed North America from the reproach of slavery only hy means of forced drafts. Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa— surely uí" homes of democracies—hove not been backward in "rounding up" the slackers. There is not a country in the whole, whole world so tender to the "slackers" as our.- In Holland, SAritzc-r- land. Sweden, the able-bodied have been summoned to the Colours. trance, with only 35 million population—Great Britain has 47 without the Colonies and ovher oversea, In tll(-, course of a few weeks 7.000,00) mobilised for the Colours. These did not include starred men. Wo ace struggling to mak e good the 4.000.000 sanctioned by a Parliamentary Act .1

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