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" A HEAVY SMOKER."

i44 FIGHTING THE FOREIGNER."

--I POSER FOR THE GUARDIANS.

I LLANSAMLET MEDICO

APPOINTED TO ABERDARE.

lliERHS'EX-iEOKER I-—————a…

-IRONCLAD'S TROUBLES.1

FROM FAR & NEAR. ————t

rFAMIUESERED 1

IASQUITH BOO'D.I

, WESTERN MINERSI IMEET.-1I

IFREE fUEL. I FREE-FUELE

CRASH IN CWM ROAD.

- - -_- -TAKEN TO HOSPITAL.

THE WAY OUT. I THE \\fY OUT.

.....-.- - -:,:_-_-:-,,:,:=..-:-:=-_.---…

i FINE CUE-WORK.

j————i DEPARTING RABBI.

WINDPIPE NOTCHED. I

MADE IN SWANSEA. j

FATHER'S SUICIDE .1

FIFTY FOOT HIGH. I ■ ^ j

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FIFTY FOOT HIGH. I ■ j NOR-WESTER AND I I HIGH TIDE. I GALE'S VIOLENCE AT SWANSEA. ) I Exciting Dock Scenes. I TWO BRITISH STEAMERS; 1 AND CREWS GONE. it Accompanying the high tide on Friday morning at Swansea was a south-westerly g-alp, which did considerable damage to the stone embankment near the "Black-boards" on the beach near the South Dock. The force of the gale may be imagined w hen it is stated huge blocks of stone were torn from the top of the wall, and the tide made great havoc at the far western corner, scouring out hundreds of tons of earth and stone. Considerable dalooge had previously been dome at this point. Breaking against the wall, the waves SHOT FIFTY FEET IN THE AIR, I and the force of the impact was like a can- nonade The stones on the coping for a dis- tance of neajrly two hundred yards were loosened, a.nd within a short time they were washed down 20ft. on to the beach below. Later in the morning the coping was all jagged—much more than previously—and in some places two yards of the stonework had been demolished. Ugly fissures could be I seen at points in the embankment, and es- pecially was this the case at the western I corner, where it appeared that the next tide would be likely to cause much further damage. The wall, which at this point runs back on to the sloping embankment, was torn off j at, the shore end. notwithstanding it was i. 4ft. wide, and at the back the tide had j swilled round and WASHED HUNDREDS OF TONS I of the earth formation away. In fact, the western wall-end Cll the foreshore is now denuded of most of its earth backing in the corner. At the other end of the embank- ment the a?e has washed away many tons j of earth, bat this is not so serious as at the I other end. The gale also the bathing ma- chines by Trafalgar Arch. The water, how- ever, did not flood the roadway. i AGAMEMNON ADRIFT. EXCITING TI!;ms IN KING'S I I. DOCK. The stormy weather which prevailed on II Thursday evening was responsible for a, series of mishaps at the King's Dock, in j [ which the big Holt liner Aga.memnon played a chief part. She arrived outside the King's Dock on Thursday evening, and whilst waiting for admission let down her, anchor in order to hold during the gale, and in so doing she fouled the moorings of the dredger and injured the ring of her I hawse pipe. When she got in the dock, j tbe heavy gale almost made her unmanage- able. It was intended to berth her on the sea, side of the dock, and with this end in I view the tugs Challenger, Cruiser and Ex- pert. were engaged. Despite, however, the I combined efforts of adl three, the Agamem- non SWUNG RIGHT ACROSS THE DOCK, I ana caane mto collision with the Norwegian I j steamer Ageroen, which was engaged in un- hiding timber at No. 3 Quay. The Ageroen was considerably damaged ¡ below the water line, and began to take in water. On Friday a diver was engaged in j ascertaining the extent of the damage, and in effecting repairs, and it reauired the ser- vices of the Trusty, the Trust's powerful tug, to tow the Agamemnon to her berth. The incident a grin brings home the neces- sity of having more powerful tugs in the port. In an exposed dock like the King's, and in a gale like that which prevailed on I Thursday, it is impossible to cope with the larger vessels except I Y the empkn nient of tugs of the power of the Trust" v. The Agampmnon is 4,462 tons and ar-1 rived from Rotterdam, the local brokers ¡ being Messrs. Burgess ard Co. Mr. H Goldberg is the broker of the Ageroen whioh 11': 596 tons register, and came to Swansea j! from Bayonne. I I ONE BY ONE. I CREW WASHED FROM RIGGING. SWANSEA TRADER LOST WITH ALL HANDS. A trading steamer laden with cement sank Ii in the English Channel off Shoreham, Sus- sex, on I hursday night. The fate of the crew ill uiiKonwn. At daylight the masts of the vescel were all that was visible from shore. It is believed that when the vessel fouu- dered the crew took to the rigging from which they were warned away one by one. The captain was rescued from the rigging by the lifeboat and conveyed to Shoroham, A iater Brighton message sa.ys eight Jives were lost, only the captain being saved. The vessel, whilst pacing the 0-were Light- ship in the gale was struck by a very heavv sea ""tticb. SMASHED IN HER HATCHES I ana let the water into the hold. The cap- tain endeavoured to reach Shore ham Har- bour, but :he vessel sank just outside.. The steamer was the My Own, of 329 gross tonnage. owned. by the Cardiff Coasters, and which was in Swansea recently loading coal, etc., for L'Orient (France). There were, however, no local men on board.

I NEATH'S GAS ENQUtRY.

[No title]

LOCAL SIFTINGS.