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During tlip past .week the Chancellor of I j the Exchequer has been listening to a depu- tation of the Farmers' Union on the subject of local taxation, the sal? of estates, -d enquire into the unfair treatment of the railway rates, and while the Chancellor ad- mitted his sympathy with the general case presented, he was unable to express agree- ment as t:• the purchase of hnd by tenants, In accordance with the invariable practice, j Mr. IJovd George declined to makeanv definite promise, hut the deputation elicited the fact that Parliament proposed to deal in the immediate future with local taxat,ion anomalies, and that, the Board cf Trade will British fanner in reference to railway rates. This is satisfactory 30 far as it goes, and encourages the hope that some indication of I the Government's intentions will be given to deputations on education grants and other matters. Too often deputatians have to leave with- out being able to ascertain the precise effect of their pleading upon a particular Mivister. He takes shelter behind his colleagues in the Ca.binet and fobs off inconvenient questions with vague generalities. Of course, Minis- '.prs must !?ok npon all questions of equal or greater ,ii». portanoe. Deputations are us- uallv coiriposed of men—or women—w ho are v solely concerned with t.he object, in which I they happen to be intere ed..The orbit of1 their vision docs not ex. ad to the possihle f effect their proposals iray have upon colla- teral issues. Ministers have to look at all sides, but due -weight, should be -iven to the > views expressed by deputations, for they are mostly drawn from the ranks of those who have, given special study to the question, or aie in a particularly favourable position for estimating, its v beering upon the ;Dfiiisi ry\i with wh'c'i thev are associated.

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