Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

8 articles on this Page

Advertising

Advertising

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

The annual banquet of the Swansea. Chamber of Commerce which took place on Saturday evemng-mamtalllmg the high standard of success now associated with the event-was rendered noteworthy by reason of au American after-dinner speech, typical of the best kind, delivered by Mr. J. L. Grif- tith, the Consul-General in this country of the United States. It vividly illustrated the essential differences in the character of such speeches as made in Great Britain and in America, now reputed, not without justifi- cation, to yjoseess the best orators in the world for festive occasions. The secret of our inferiority is not far to see. In re- straint, soberness of statement, dignity of language, and closeness of reasoning British Parliamentarians have no equals in any country, and our public meetings, as a rule, are worthy of the people who were the first to enjoy and appreciate the right to iree speech.. In the United States the Congressional seeches are reproduced in extenso in the recerd&sai-netimes when not even delivered -and copies are available for distribution amongst the newspapers in the area repre- sented by the speaker, and the oratory, roarmly designed for local rather than na- tional consumption (stride, except on very rpre occasions the principal newspapers give little 5pace to it), is apt to have the same quality and the defects of that found most telling by politicians "on the stump dealinf with audiences very mixed in com- position and peculiarly susceptible to re- aniinrlinz worets'and xhrases, which may on analysis dispose little that is either w?dom or even common sense, and to anec- dotes of a pungent or humorous character This oratorv, too n.mboyant for -Britiq.? ??e. h? not i?ptly ?.cn cl???d ? the spread-cagle patt?r?i. ? poetry partaking of the same dis?n?<?? ve cha?rter the term "Turkey carpet, because th? e?ec? of the latter are produced by vio- lent contra.sts in colour. Am?ca-n oratory is h?rd at its best.at public dinn?. fany causes havt? (?olitri? buted to thi. Tn the ?t Ar. ?r. have a strong Rnd undi?g?s? .?y £ ?-i.ng bored." when th.y a-e opposed to t?f?tive.andcon?quentiytl? prop? o?f ?.d Te?ponders to to?ts are selected pnm- ariiv because they can speak and entertain anr1 interest the company, and not oerause f .hdr social or commerce importance, 1 ? the p05i1ions they occimy. The know- dse of thi= h? Teacted upon the spexke?, ivho t.?th?- obli?d? ?'riou?y. and in- '—. '?  ? moment-which may faa the tro&t competent moment—which may fafl'the coll?'pet,6nt ?.?cv?o ?ost carefuny?a.rt? slipshod de- Hv.a-T)f? by -writing their ?P?c?es' 'pol6??n- "'? .ver\ sentence, introducing discovered • (IT even original joke and stories, and ?o ?Joi?hlv memorising the production that  dramâJtie value. The .peaker  011 ,cc,ou nt of bii record is i?ll frequent deryiatid r;°X" ■« *• | ?? ?r ?ampl.. ? wnter h.uch fol" tot-lists T\út mfrequentl: re- a -bo(-,k-let-a (,,f hip  suMrblv printed, to seTve ? a  ar- dent sons and It-vers of ",Tales ?n the United 8??-Geneia? T. L. ?1??. Wh?n it is r.mem.be? that m AmN'i('a <?to? is t?ght m tl? ?bools ? ^cohepre -whMh h? debating cont?? as ,e?xcit fng M fo?ball m??hes in the prebe.nce ot *hv pa?l? of the debars and the puMic. and fa the boys r??nti?g the lwoduotd; of t?e schools and collars read?y find tlie?r way into politics where tLeir oratorical e?fts a?e matured by coœwnt pi?ttce and studious cuw-vation-it must be reaJi.soo that tihe system is fair more l?k?Iy to be fruitful than our haphazard method;- which allowed Lord Ro se.be ry—.now fat- and a wiay -ta- happiest speaker this side of tkile Atlantic for no n-political purposes—to be- come Prime Minister before he had attained even a moderate proficiency in expressing hinjoelf in public. The matter WiIIlS splen- did, but the delivery so fautlty that, the upeecth always revealted merits to the reader of its report, hidden to those who bad actually heard it. The writer recalls an addt?w Eiv? by the Pnmroae F?rl to Biitish J?-MLli&? at Edinburgh ?v?- S? ? a?o, w? the 1m1ts and pauses P?ticaJJty spo? a most ckmi^ Edi? It is alleged, that realising h.s dkoMp, Lord Ropery went for tui- tion to one of tbe foremost- flocutlOn;ss of the period, and was thereby cured of defee-ts in delivery of speeches watb the result .hat be becMMthe undispu?ted orator of the Em- pire. On the other aids of the Atlantic, Mlr, Chaunoey Depew is the acknowledged amongst after-dinner speakers. His ense of humour is so generally reoqginised taat when he was suggested as a Republican can- didate for the -vice -pe&id e,n t, a position for whidh his giraat intellectual glifts eminently fitted him, the suggestion was regarded as his latest joke and literally kungftoed out of the programme. When, some yeanp ago, he Plaited England, and spoke at a dinner party made up chiefly of Volunteer officers, the reception granted his speech was such that he returned home convinced that no fterise of humcVitr was left in this country. Frar, asked to propose the toast of the Ie V oluntoor Force —this was before the latter had proved its value in the South Airiaam War—he confined himself to saying ? was quite unnecessary to use the lang- lage of laudation in respect of a body wJhoæ ^frvioec were so well understood and appre- rjated, so he would merely ask those pre- "It to dirink to the "British Volinteerf- ;nvinc,j?,ble in peatoe, invisible in war." There was neither laugliter noir applause. Mr. Griffith, who has been likened to Mr. 4 Rtlir d ay even i n g e. auncey Depew, on Saturday evening f Ve the members of the Swansea Chamber Commerce such a taste of the finished alrlcan after-dinner speech as met,iphoric- th y ''raised the roof." Diction polished to comma, sentirrents irresistible in of eir appeal, the humorous story, the dash Senia] cynicism—all contributed to the ^or Mr. Griffith,! a Cymric Celt— mediate forbears from Carnarvon a;>d -A I "StwYtli lefi. no loophole.for doubt in rc-?ard—made every point tell. Uncon- oit?ly he enforced the truth, which hill; <jnrie need to be recognised at Swansea, tha' Qne, whatever his J1()¡:m. hrs the righ. t<'> ':he {Cun and tOO;G'r .^ntherings me;lJ b, Pl £ asa-nt and a^ « able for evpryone -ent. n<^f"^red, the next principal speaker, did p1 I.n this respect. He, too, held the '?t?TeM, ? ?? company, after all the chief *?uh-<?. Tbl aww?.9feature of his J W—WBW—WWI———wwwwpw speech was a definite declaration in favour of a Second Chamber invested with real power and importance. In view of the Pre- mier's announcement of an intention to make a very tardy redemption of his pro- mise in introducing the Parliament Act, crippling the House of Lords, this pronounce- ment of the Borough member for a genuine Upper House is significant as an indication of the feeling amongst the non-Socialist ele- ment in the Liberal party. The references to the gradual disappearance of business men from the House of Commons, due partly to the scant encouragement given them, could lend itself to the interpretation amounting to a reproach against a Ministry com- posed almost entirely of barristers and soli- citors. And public opinion would be ready to adopt and endorse it.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]