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Our friend the enemy is anticipating the new Session of Parliament with shivering doubts that are good to see. At th- time of the passing of the Parliament Act he was "as bold as brass" now he lays a timid hand on your arm amd hopes he finds you well and will you please let bygones be No opening of a Session within memory \VM quite so interesting as this one. It was anticipated tha.t when the Home "Rule allies got near the consummation of their ho. thev would be seized with something like a panic. Dark rumours have reached them of the terrible machinations contemplated by the Opposi- tion, and their minds are oppressed with the possibility of the, loaves and fishes vanishing into thin aiT before they are n pumj ;roiilo aiql un -ja,plo s^wp Surm they escape the snares set bv the Opposition and if a compromise on Home Rule is not secured they must of necessity go on to the bitter end and pass the Home Rule Bill—with results which no man can foresee. It is not surprising that we should henr of tbtkn gathering in melanoholv little grbups in their clubs and talking lugubriously of the Parliamentary prospect. At the very moment when Mr. T. P. O'Copnor, in the dulcet tones with which he hao;: wooed and won a Ini-,Tet and easilv blarneyed section of the British public, is urging in his most caressing way that it would be an excellent thing to have the Home Rule problem settled by consent—at that very moment the Opposition leaders cause a new scare in the Radical dovecots by assembling at Lansdowne House and discussing the political sitpation for two hours-which is about the duration of a Cabinet Council in D vwning-street. Wh !1 does it mean? And then on the top of everything comes the black and sinister announcement that the complimentary banquet to Sir Edward Carson at the Constitutional Club, arranged to take place on the day of the opening of Parliament, has been postponed. There must be some bidden wickedness in this! And so our ha^p-l less Radical (res over his halfpenny POIT-er, I momiiug and evening, and looks for com- fort which does not come. Hi? does not know whether his distinguished but austere and reticent leader, Mr. Asquith, is parley- ing with the political enemy behind the scenes, or merely gettin.rr ready (as giuig- giestsd by a clever Punch" crartioon) to play the piano for the bright particular star" of the Ministerial company, the Ohiaaioallor of the Exchequer. We hear it rumoured that the Prime Minister,, in order to show that he is going to have no nonsense from the Little Navy people, intends to push Mr. Churchill to the front in th> big debates of the Session. The little conspiracy, hatched by a few well-known Radicals and Socialists, to get rid of the First Lord of the Admiralty has failed. It has been suggested that Mr. Churchill would not k ve been sorry if it had succeoded, since it vould have assisted him to recross the fioo with some plausi- bil it- wid even with little self-respect, but who is going to believe such a malicious tale as that? A thousand times no. Mr. Churchill joined the Radical party from conviction, not only sincere but ardent, and if any section of the coalition were so grate- ful as to drive him off the Treasury Bench, he would accept his hard fate with a noble resignation and still devote himself to the sublime democratic eauses to which he has I dedicated his life. Anyhow, there is to be no tragedy. We I gather that the First Lord of the Admiralty has the Prime Minister on-his side, and that must mean a majority of the Cabinet. So the Protean Winston, with his genius for adapting himself to conditions, will be-al conspicuous performer on the boards at Westminster once more, and no doubt we shall have the innocent gratification of hear- ing him cheered to the echo by the very men who have been trying to get rid of ¡ him.

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