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———"—————— I The open-air class for Swansea school children that has been conducted Dyfattv School has yielded valuable results, not only in the improvement in the physical health and mental alertness of the children that has been noted by doctors and teachers, but in pointing the way possibly to the adoption of a more economical tvpe of biulding. In Carnarvonshire a school that may be generally reproduced has been built with one side constructed entirely of plate glass windows +.1'11 Cal) be rolled back in nne- weather or closed in rainy weather, admitting the maximum of light and air. t pon the strength of the medical officer's report a much wider extension of the open- air principle is justified at Swansea; as well a.s the considering of the question to what extent a principle so successfully applied can be embodied in the design of the new schools, whose cost is an almost oppressive item in the educational outlay in the town, and an item nevertheless that stands for no more than a negative factor in education. It is curious that whilst the British, as a list ion, are more receptive to the doctrine of fi, sh air and open windows than any other nation—though in other countries the pI edomi nantly agricultural and therefore open-air life of the people atones for errors in their ways-they have a climate that offers less, inducement to open-air life than that of any other people. British weathr is at its best not easily to be surpassed, but these favourable spells are but the ex- ceptions to a general rule of conditions that in the prolonged winter seasons try all eon- stitutions but the hardiest. Possibly it is to make amends for our inability to live in the open as much as other people have the opportunity of doing that we open our win- dows so freely. In the schools the arrange- ments for ensuring the best possible ven- tilation are elaborate and expensive, though sjstems that- work without occasioning com- pla.ints are difficult to discover. Years ago Herbert Spencer, in a pamph- let, illustrated the limitations of humanity by pointing to the inability of the House of Commons, with all the skill and braine of the nation to draw upon, to devise even a tolerably good system of ventilation for the Lower Chamber, and to this day. after the expenditure of many thousands of pounds, the legislation of the nation has to be framed 1:1 a vitiated and enervating atmo. phere. At the Dyfatty School the most successful of all systems—the simplest one, of aHmving the air free access everywhere—has been ex-I perimented with and yielded noteworthy re- sults that counsel a wide extension of the system, combi.iin?. iridirectly, enhanced emcienc.y of teaching, :mpoved health, and cheapness. This last consideration will be with many people the most popular and co- gent of all. The proposed municipal baths would mark a further advancement of public hygiene. A campaign for cleanliness has been com- menced by the gradual abolition of road surfaces that disentegrate into woeful mud and slush. Tt would be materially aided by the erection of baths in districts where kw houses are at present so equipped, but still more stimulated by the creation of a serasi- tiVG public opinion upon the subject in quarters where there is at present indiffer- ence. The staple occupation in South Wales and its seaports, the handling of coal, is inevitably grimy; but it is also, as at pre- sent conducted, upnec-essarily-grimy. Th- absence of washing places at pit heads and at docks cannot be held to be otherwise than a reproach to employers and to em- ployed. In South Wales there are conspicu- ously absent qualities akin to the orderly neatness of the French and the scrupulous cleanliness and symmetry of the Germans, ar.d it if of little avail to boast of progress I or development in other directions whilst thPTc is such conspicuous remissness in this sphere. —————

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