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.EXIT, THE SWANS.I

"EAST .V. WEST."I

HOW THE OTHERS FARED.

NEATH SERVANT'S DEATH.

MR. TRUEMAN'S LATEST.I

[No title]

"TtBERS TAILI TWISTED.

PONTARDAWE V. BRIDGEND.

ABERAYONY. NEATHI

I LLANELLY V. PENARTH.

AMMANFORD V. SWAN-1 ! .SEA…

"WOiEl FIRST." 1 0———

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"WOiEl FIRST." 1 0 ——— DISASTROUS OCEAN CRASH. FORTY-EIGHT LIVES I LOST IN FOG. I Thrilling Heroism. I Forty-eight lives were lost on Friday through the sinking of the American steam- ship Monroe (4,704 tons), belonging to the Old Dominion Steamship Company, in a collision in a fog with the Baltimore steam- ship Nantucket (2,599 tons). The Monroe was bound from Norfolk, I Virginia, to New York. Of the passengers 24 were lost and 31 were saved by the Nan- tucket; of the crew 24 were lost and 55 saved. The saved include Captain John- son and all the other officers, except the second engineer. The Monroe left here (says a Reuter mes- sage from Norfolk) on her regular trip to New York. The track of coaatal steamers between the two ports is comparatively close to the shore. Dense fog enveloped the coast. The position cf the ships is reported to have been near Hog Island. The Nantucket has arrived hetre with 85 survivors of the Monroe and the bodies of two of the Monroe's passengers who lJlV. i<±iOxVi ji^vruiburiii. I I after they had been taken irom tne water. Some of the rescued persons stated that the Some of the "d '? .d the M.. Nantucket raked and rammed the Monroe in a dense fog at. two o'clock in the morn- ing. The Monroe careened and turned turtle in ten or twelve minutes. As she turned on her side some of the passengers and crew crawled over on the ex- posed part of the bottom and walked about until they were finally washed off as the vessel went to the bottom, keel uppermost. But for the fact that there had been time to adjust the lifebelts many more would-have been lest. As it was, those who were res- cued remained in the water for half oi, three-quarters of an hour before they were got out. Jtl UBiiAiNJJ O i3KA V E One ot the bodies in the JNantucket is that of Mrs. Thomas Harrington. Her hrs- band told how he swam with her hair in his teeth till they were picked* up. His wifa was then too exhausted to recover. Mr. E. P. Lyons, who was clad onlv in pyjamas and a bath Iob. said thv f ghorn wa.s blowing every minute when suddenly two severe blasts which were twice repeated convinced him ihat something was the matter. He rushed on deck and 8W the, bow of the Nantucket come out of the fog. It struck the Monroe near her nort bow. He ran below and tried to dress, but owing to the vessel's list he could not stand up. j He hurried back on deck, when he saw i very few passengers. One lifeboat was swung overboard. WOMEN FIRST." "rrvt. /vi- T + 5\ i x ut) tjapi-itiii \aTI i. i:wuwiiueuj told me to jump in. which I did. I had to jump to make it. \V. left the captain on board, but as it was evident that the Monroe was sinking our boat returned and got the captain cfi. The crew behaved splendidly. The women were allowed to get in the boats first."

-.--I "TUPPENNY HA'PENNY"!…

WOULD LESSEN BANKRUPTCIES.

ICE IN THE SEINE.

[No title]

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PONTARDAWE WORKSI DISPUTE.

THE TINPLATE" POOL."

"BEING UNDER-MINED."

A SWANSEA CINEMA. I