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LOOKED LIKE GINGER BEER!i…

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STAJ tCHFIELD'S. ORDEAL.

" THE VOTE."

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THE VOTE." FEMALE SUFFRAGE I QUESTION. I !LLUMtNATtNG SWAN- SEA DEBATE. The "Nomen's Suffrage question wa.s the subject of a most intere&ting debate at the Jumof Imperw. IJeague Club, Ce&le,-build- tngs, Swansea, on Monday night, the anirma- tive being ta&eqi by Miss Foxloy, M.A. (of CaidiS), and the negative by MAas G<la.dye Pott, of London, and the pity of it i!< that the Albert HaJl was not Miga-ged fo'- the pur- pose bemnse the chib-roofm w&a crowded to the doora. Alderman David T)avieg, aa referee, pre- sided, and aep&r&ted the two la<tMa on the pl&t.torm, though, ae events proved. there wae no need even for thi«. fto oalmly and de- Li b eratEs ] Uberatety was the debatp named on. It was, in fact. an mtellectuaj treat. Tho two ladies presprnted ftrikingiy di rfer.cnt a.ppear- ay-,i and mianners. MiM Pott. who ea- po'Baed the caose of the National League for opposing Women's Suffrage, came on to the platform and sa.t there as n she had a serious to tackle—not a smile but a note- book. Mias FoxJey, of th<; National Dnion of Women's 8ufFra.ge Societies, on the con- trary, was all smiles and no notes. -Miss Pott, tall and wel! buitt, is a, Monde.1iSt; ?'oxley, wea,ring gla.ssej5, ia a bmn<et.te. RUDBS OF DEBATE. The Uhairman bneny introduced them, b:it the audience had already decided which '7: the 'Suffragist. The r'lles of the debate T"enty nNnntes to each apea.ker; ten Tji))t<'s reply; general diaouasion for thirty !te. and then ten mimjtes aUowad to :.8 ch My to wind up the debate. The resolution before the meeting ran: Tha.t this meeting approves of the ext-en- xion of the Paruajnenta.ry Franchise to ?. onMn," and the Chajrma.n, In simply read- ing it out, observed that he was niclin<d to think that the debate would afford them the cpport.umty of seeing how puMic qUestions should he debated, that was with the mini- mum of hea.t ajid the maximum of sweet rea.oona.b}nes. and light. (Hear, hear, and !a"s;hteT'. ) WHY THEY SHOULD NOT. I I, !vl3lqs rott openon tne can. mace wm not Mrm-it of ajl the argurrentig she uced against giving -N%-owen the vote, but In the most cmi- tured -voice and manner, wjth occa.sic'naj c!utchea at the Ia.ppets of bar co&t as a man I-Ymii do, she Md down har Tory cleaa* de- finitions of terma like "Reform," ".PoH- tlos." Government." and Home." a<nd, ;,aV'Íllp; argued that legislation, to be good, nnMt be f<T the greatest good of the greatest number, came to her own sex. I think Rhe is Mi admir&Me sex," said Miss Pott, and I have aJways thought so. There are. however, two great duties to be performed, one mixing with the communistic side of life —the business aide of life. And the other —which is equally important—oornirea io, 'mt is not connned to, the immedia-te domea- tic circle, embraang the ca<re of the indi- V':dua.l from the cradle to the grave. (Heaj*, hear.) It does not matter whether it is within the four walls of the cottage, whether if ia in the great hospitals or the Balkan ha,ttIene3dB of last year, or the Zen&na. Mia- "ion field of our great Empire of India<— vberever the md!vid'uAl r&quires attention t.h&t M Hhc place requiri-ig a duty to be per- formed, and if not performed then your pro- Treee and onrilisa-tioc cnimbleg to mthing. Tha person who perfo'Tm< that daty ml DJaoo the caTe of the indmdn&l pa,ra.'mouut to the community. Has not NatTire itself," ?a,!d Miaa Pott. emphasMing this partiontar sphere of 'woman's woTk in life. "pointed out th&t ma.n can more eSIoient'ly perform the nrat duty and woTnan the second class of duty? (ife&r, hear.) Yon can replace them. but if you do you lose the physical force implanted in maji and the mothering Instinct of women. and if you lose power \cu stop progress." She proceeded to ar- ?ne that man developed the habit of mind of placing the community before the indi- vidual, whilst the woman, if she was per- forming the second class of duty, waa de- veloping tha habit <?f mind of placing the Individual before the community. And if my premisea are correct," Miss Pott added. then women would uot make good voters nnd they ought not to have It." (Hear, bear.) WHY THEY KHUUL.1!. J Now it was Miss Foxley .s turn. Spe&K- In.s: much more deliberately she jdÍned issue with Mias Pott in eome of her definitions and then argued that GoTemment is done for TM'' by the experts, in the persona of the permanent onicials, so that wo ara not ourselves a self-governing people." If the.t wa<t so the vote ww not :m instniment of government. But though t'he people were iio,t oat)ablf, of perfonning a surgical opera,- tioQ yet they were aMe to ca-11 the doctor. In other words. Misa FoxJey said they were able to draw attention to the neoclff of the individual and the community. (Hear. he&r.') With some amount of force Miss Foxley s¡.x>ke of the rapid economic changes in the needs of the community, and it was the that the vote would prove of advantage to the women in the future. It wae idle to t :Jk of a man's world and a woman's world. They met together in the home and outside and the TesponsibiMy of tha individual -%vas theirs as wfU a. tha men's. "I do not think that woman \j:"hes that her instinqa shcuM bp outsicie the home." saad Miss Fox- !pv. 'a but it is just because the Government inches us from the cradle to the grave that ve fool that it is only right and fair tha.t we should have our pay in regard to cha,ng&9, particularly thoso which are going to make for healthier and better children in o"ir homes and sanding them ont. from those homes into the wider world outside." (Hear. hear.) The i'esTi!ta m other ootintries. where women had the franchise, were quoted, and Misa Foxicy contended for the recognition ;)-f women as a.n in7portmt factor in the home and therefgm in the oommimity. (Ap- plause.) Both ladies theo replied in tnrn. Miss Pott pointing out that the trend of paat lo{(ial&tion had b-mefittoo men and women :).Hke I A LITTLE OUTBURST I Miaa Phipps (Munidpa.1 Secondary Gins' Sch<3ot) opened t-he discussion amrma-tively I and made quotation. Name," aaud Misg Pott. 'Mms Phippa g&VG her authority. Th?n came another HHota?on. "N&me," ?aJd Miaa Potts, "i ?F.vp. forKOtten tha,t," snid Misa Phippa. f1! little heatedly, "but I am not telling lips." (He&r, hea.r, and la-ughter.) Mrs. Dr. Knight spoke &gamst the reooln- bion, arguing that the vote might place women on an equa.lity with Ytten in the la.- hour market, with the result that married women would be attracted ajid the r&te of intnntile niorta.Uty would B:u up. ?fisa B. Davids, Mrs. Wheatley, &nd Miss !?eale supported th? motion. I Mias Pott and Mws F<jix)ey then wound ,:p t9i& debate, the tbrnMr elicitting laughter w hen ahe s&id the logical t-e<?ult of giving II women the vote WM that they should <nt in the HouM of OMnjnona. "a.nd Heavea pi-e t,erv€ )ne fru'u the condittouof Enigiaj;d thfn." HOW THE VOTE WENT. a w The vote went by iL majority in tavour ) ufIl\ Foxloy. but the adynirstimi for sub- UouJ knoe3ti in de 00 ,te I wenh wttit the Londoll ]y. The Cha'trniaM was cordta.lly thanked, icr prf'didiug and Le declared tha,t they had lia-bened to a moot illuminating, belpfnj Mtd I interesting debate. (AppJa.ua6.) Amongst thoae preaent were the Mayorcga (Mrf. Oorker). Mre. CbaA. Wright, Mr. and 'frl". W. J. ReM', Nfrx. ilnrl M'f!s Aerl Th-<ma.t. \11'1. Da'.ld D, MNI. f a.d(> ¡ Mrp. G. M. Bevan. lrs. Morgsin T)a,dee, Moa..B<u"Mt GkJdberg, and Mrø.. lvloom

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EAST StDE NURSING ASSOC!AT!ON.

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I BOXtNG.

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