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THE OMNIBUS. I

Llandilo Rural District I…

GARNANT. I

LLANDEBIE. I

LLANDILO. 1

IPENYGROES. I

[ BRYNAMMAN.I

I Eisteddfod at Llandebie.…

I BURIAL OF REV. PENAR GRIFFITHS.…

I Brynamman War Prisoner.…

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I Brynamman War Prisoner. Following is a brief account of a BJyn- amman prisoner of war's experiences in Ger- many;- After being captured in Mametz Wood, on the Somme, on July 11th, 1916, we were taken to Cambrai," and from there, travelling in a railway van (60 in each van), with the doors shut, for three days-- came to Dulmen Camp, Westphalia. In the first few months we were treated outrageously, and suffered many indignities. We v/ere forced to be inoculated five times and vaccinated once in the first three weeks. The food was of a very poor quality, and exceedingly small in quantity. The only solid food we had was the daily ration of bread—one slice half-an- inch thick. We were forced to work every day, when we were unable to stand on our feet almost through weakness. It was a com- mon occurrence for us to go and look into swill tubs and refuse heaps, &c., for any- thing we could find, and aonsidered ourselves lucky if we got some potato peelings, which we ate with relish. in November, 1916, I was included in a working party sent to Russian Poland to work, and arriving at our destination after a train journey of four days, were sent out immediately to work. As soon as it was light enough to see in the morning, we started to work, and worked until it was too dark to work any longer, with half-an- hour's break mid-day. We were put in a barn to sleep on some straw. We were given no blankets, -and the cold was unbearable. Owing to ill-nourlshment and weakness, we were infested with vermin. After six weeks of this treatment we were sent back to Dulmen. Our parcels from England were coming through by this time, and things im- proved a little. The Germans would never try to make us comfortable, but they would go a long way out of their way to make us uncomfortable. I was shifted from Dulmen to the camp at Sennelager, where, after a little time, I was appointed the bandmaster of the British concerts; and in this position was given many privileges. I was an eye-witness of many murderous assaults and atrocities com- i mitted on our men by German sentries. Early in 1917 I witnessed the arrival of a party of British prisoners who had been made to work behind the firing line for two or three months. They were in a terrible and emaciated condi- tion. They looked like mere bags of bones, and they died at the rate of six and seven per day. Very few of them pulled through. All our thanks are due to our own Government for supplying us with food. We could not possibly live on the German rations. They are a barbarous set of people, and after being in their hands for two and a half years, I need hardly say how much I appreciate the fact that I'm home again. I HERBERT WILLIAMS, R.W.F." N.B.—The released prisoner, Mr. Herbert Williams, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Williams, of the Brynamman Orchestral ciety, Ardwyn Place, and is an organist at a London chapel, but now at home in Bryn- amman, recuperating. For some time after his arrival he could not quite realise that he was free, and often, through sheer force of habit, with alert eyes looked behind for the German sentry who followed him everywhere for the two and a half years he was a pri- soner. That the armistice was signed was made known to him at a Cologne Opera House, when the British flag appeared on the stage as the curtain rose. He is gradually divesting himself of the now imaginary fetters. —" Butts."

DEMOCRACY OR ANARCHY?

IBRYNAMMAN UNITED SOLDIERS'…

-"_-._-__- - - - AT EIN GOHEBWYR…

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Lloffion o -Lanfihangel. I

DIARFOGIAD (DISARMAMENT).…

iEisteddfod Carmel, llandebie;

BUDDUGOLIAETH Y CYMRO.

IDYCHWELIAD Y BECHGYN.

I - BRYNAMAN.-