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POLITICS NR WMim

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POLITICS NR WMim Br WOMAN votbr. Tin most xaomentoue election fit tho I tory of this Otfuntry » ovw. The women of England have cast their first Parliamentary vote, aad woe Bow have to wait with what patience we oan mueter to know the result; but I will say at oaoe that I am decidedly more satisfied with the general outlook than I was three weeks ago, or even one week. From the Prime Minister's point of view the tide undoubtedly turned at the last moment. Why this tide of popularity should ever have ebbed is unaccountable, but the Prime Minister has himself to blame. For some unknown reason he persisted in avoiding the main issues—whether Germany should pay and whether enemy aliens should be expelled from this country. These were treated as side issues, and it was not until is speech at Bristol, three days before poll- ing day, that he really made anything ap- proaching a satisfactory announcement. His speech on this occasion left much to be de- sired, but, from the women's point of view, was a vast improvement on his unsatisfac- tory oration at the women's meeting at the Queen's Hall, London. Of course, we women, being less apathetic and far more exacting in the patriotic sense than the men, it comes as a shock to the politicians to find that for the first time they have to be decided and definite in their pronouncements, and they may yet have to learn that the women will force them really to do the things they have promised, which will be another quite new expejience for, any way, the lawyer section of our politicians. But even then I fail to understand why Mr. Lloyd George should delay to the last mo- went making a definite statement on his policy regarding the treatment of Germany, when it was generally agreed that without it there was a very grave danger of the Coalition being, if not defeated, very badly shaken. The only question that remains to be answered now is whether he originally in- tended to do the right thing, or whether it was foroe of circurofitnuces and the weight of public opinion that compelled him to. The late hour to which he left it certainly gives one the impression that the latter was the case. One of the most interesting features is the fact that the Prime Minister's final an- nouncement is pra-etically i-cleiitical with the .TiewH expressed in the articles several weeks ago. Of corrse, I do nrt presume that he reads them, but it is certainly very satis- factory to find that the opinions forcasted here are now the policy of ihe Prime Minis- ter. I do not claim credit for originating these ideas, as I must admit I copied most of them from the policy of the National Party, and I have heard it t-nid in many consti- tuencies that it was in resporse to the urgent appeals from Coalition candidates who were faced by National Party opponents, that the Prime Minister and his followers were forced at the eleventh hour to adopt their pro- gramme in an effort to avoid defeat. Any of my women readers who were pre- sent at the Prime Minister's Women's Meet- ing at the Queen's Hall, London, will agree that he had no easy time. Perhaps that de- cided him to adopt the policy that the women demanded. This is very probably the case, and, if so, we can claim to have thoroughly justified our right to vote. Nothing now remains but to await the result, and if the women of England have done their duty the Coalition will have won in every seat where the National Party have not nominated a candidate. Perhaps it would be as well if I made clear one point that, to judge from correspon- dence, has been misunderstood. I suggested that public-houses be so reformed that they could be used by both men and women with- out shame. By this I mean that they should be e,-tirely recorganised, not merely camou- Jaged, but run on such l ines that tea, coffee, or wine could be had with light meals in the same manner as at the cafes and tea- rooms run by Messrs. Lyons throughout the provinces, only perhaps more comfortable, and that tbeyvs ould provide for the work- ing and middle classes what the West-End clubs and cafee provide for the more well- to-do.

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