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ROSS v. LEDBURY. III

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PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND…

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PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND I AROUND LEDBURY. Dog Hill. I A lofty eminence just above the Church, and overlooking the town, giving a clear view of the Marcle Hills, and a panoramic view of the country this side the hills. There are *,hreo jubilee seats placed on the top The place can be approached from Church -street or through the ci lrchyard. Bradlow Knoll. About 1 mile from the town, and a pleasant walk to the summit. Extensive views can be obtained when the atmosphere is bright. Gloucester Cathe- dral tower is plainly seen with the naked eye, and also the white cliffs above Cheltenham. In the west may be seen the Black Mountains, and May Hill in the Forest of Dean, to the south-west. Eastnor Castle. I A little over two miles from Ledbury. The Castle I is a fine baronial mansion, with massive towers, and is partly surrounded by a fine sheet of water. Inside the Castle are fine works of art, by the best masters, some beautiful specimens of tapestry, and an inter- I esting collection of armour. T' r The Raggedstone Hill. I famous ior tue curse, wnicn, according to an old legend, falls on all who come beneath its s hadow. The curse is the legacy of a monk of the ancient Priory of Little Malvern, whose penance consisted of the daily aacent of the hill on all fours." The Obelisk. j Un tile Matvern Range, overlooking Bronsil I Castle. It is 90 feet high and was erected in memory of Lord Chancellor Somers and various members of the Somers family. Wynd's Point. -four miles from Ledbury, close to the British Camp. A very romantic, secluded spot, which for fouryears was the home of Jenny Lind, where she died in 1887. Wellington Heath. This lovely hamlet lies about li miles north-west of Ledbury. It is somewhat of a miniature Mal- vern, standing on hilly ground, though it is hid from VIew from the town of Ledbury by the Frith I Wood, behind which it is sheltered from the north. The houses are dotted here and there between the two hills. The road leading to the Heath is rather billy in parts, and its undulating formation gives it a romantic touch. Hope End, once the residence of Elizabeth Barrett- Browning, the poetess, is close to the village, but the building afterwards gave way to a modern mansion, built by the Icite Mr C A Hewitt, who was unfortunately compelled to leave the place owing to it being gutted by fire. From the top of the Heath some lovely landscapes are obtained.

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