Hide Articles List

15 articles on this Page

Advertising

GYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLE NOTES.

Advertising

I PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.

Advertising

I - NEXT WEEK'S ROYAL SHOW._

Advertising

REVIEWS.

Advertising

IPLACES OF INTEREST IN AND…

f- .REDMARLEY.

VISIT OF THE NON-MILITANT…

News
Cite
Share

VISIT OF THE NON-MILITANT SUFFRAGETTES TO LEDBURY. An Orderly Meeting. An open-air meeting was held in the proximity of the Old Town Hall, Ledbury, on Friday last, in support of Women's Suffrage, under the auspices of the West Midland Women's Suffrage Society. The Re Canon Bulkeley, Rector of Coddington, presided over a large audience. It wap anticipated by some of the members of the gathering that there would besome rowdyism, but, however, the meeting proceeded with a very small amount of disturbance. Two ladies and the Chairman spoke very eloquently and at the end of the speeches they were greeted with applause. In opening the meeting the Chairman quoted some of the speeches made by that great orator, Mr John Bright, and said that though Mr bright spoke against the suffrage being granted to women and voted against it, yet he believed that it would be given to women in the end. The women bad shown what they could do in many ways and he was sure they could do good for the affairs in this country. The women wanted the vote, but they were going to get it in a peaceful way. The organisation under which they met that night was non-militant and non-party and was working in a constitutional way to get the vote. They bad absolutely no connection with the militants, and no militant was allowed to join the Society. Why did John Bright object to giving the vote to womeu ? Not because it was right or wrong, but because he thought it likely that it would throw the power into the hands of women who belonged to the party he did not approve of. That was a wrong view to take. The proper thing was to do a thing because it was honest and just. They should consider whether it was right and juwt whether they should keep so many women, who were competent to exercise a just power and a reasonable power in the affairs of their country, which they had shown in other ways in many departments, whether it was right to keep them without the franchise. He thought the boys and girls present when they grew up would be certain to see the franchise extended to women. The members of the Society under whose auspices the.v met that night were most strongly against the acts of the militant section, who w trked for the same thing as they did, but tried to obtain it by meinq they utterly disapproved of. He ceitainly was very sorry because only a very short time ago the Church be knew best; in England, where he was accustomed to worship from boyhood, at Waldegrave, in Berkshire, was burnt down by these foolish suffragettes. They dis- approved of such actions. (Applause.) Miss Knight, on being introduced to the githering, gave a very lucid address, and said they were a non-tuilitant, non-party, active service league of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Society. She gave a descriptive account of the society and its workings. The reason why women wanted the vote was because they bad different views to men on most questions. The laws of the country ought to reflect the opinion of all the people of the country, but at the present time they only reflected the opinion of the men. She dealt strongly with sweated labour amongst women and related some of her experiences in London and Birmingham. Cheap goods were being produced at the expense of women's health and the health of the rising generation. Years ago the men bad not the power of the vote, but now they had got it look at the immense benefit they bad derived from it. She stated that trade unionism would be of no use if it was not for the power of vote. All classes were con- cerned in the vote, and it was not only for one class but for them all. In countries where women had the vote they took more interest in .the work of the home, and the countries where women were not taken into consideration were in a poor way. Mrs Covvmeadow also gave a lengthy address in which she stated that the demand for votes for women was not a new demand, but one that had been existent for many years. The newspapers had always gone against them, but lately they had been more fairly treated. This was a great ad vance- that the Press were giving them fair treat- ment at last. If they got public opinion on there side. Parliament would be bound to pass a measure to confer upon them the right. to votf. Th action of the militant section was u tuing the cause suffer very much, but they bad no connection whatever with it. Their object was to put their case before the male voters of the country, and ask them for their help and sympathy. Their demands were made as broad as they could, but they were prepared to take less than they asked for, knowing that the country would not sanction such a radical change at once. They, as women, bad the interest of the country at heart, and many questions were discussed in Parliament where their help would bd most useful. A great number of Acts had been passed that affected women and children and they thought it only right that they should be consulted before laws were passed. In conclusion she dealt with many of the Bills that had been discussed in Parliament regard to women's suffrage. Miss Holland, of Colwall, also gave a short address, and said that they wanted the women to work for the cause as hard as they possibly could. Anyone in the Led- bury district who wished to join the society should see Miss Bickham or Miss Maddison. She wanted to thank them for the way they had listened to the visitors that night. She remarked humorously that no one had mis- taken them for militants. She did not want them to stop the militants if they came there the best way to stop them would be to go away from them, and when they found no one listening to them they would soon go. That was one of the best things to crush militancy. Rev Canon Bulkeley proposed a vote of thanks to the lady speakers, which was seconded by Mr Bray, who said it was< the first time he had had the privilege of speak- ing on a political platform. He had much pleasure in seconding, and said that women's suffrage was one of the greatest political matters of the time. The women's move- ment was gaining ground very rapidly in this country. He thought it was most noble of the ladies to devote their time to the advocacy of the cause. He had the utmost pleasure in seconding the vote of thanks, and also to the Chairman. During the meeting several local members of the society went round the audience enrolling members and friends," and quite a large number joined. There were no questions asked and the proceedings terminated after a most orderly gathering, in which the biggest nuisance were the children, who at the close gave vent to their spirits by cheering and booing.

Advertising

PRACTICAL PRESCRIPTION AGAINST…

ITHE ARMY MANSUVRES.I