Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

Advertising

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR, 1

LEBBURY HUNT HEDGINGI COMPETITIONS.

HEREFORD MARKET.

ELECTING LICIT FOR LUBIR.…

[No title]

SALE IF WORK Nl LEBBiBY PARK.

I I THE -COST OF SWINE FEVER.I

News
Cite
Share

I THE COST OF SWINE FEVER. 232,000 in Compensation Last Yaar. i Mr Runciman, President of the Board of Agriculture, defended his department in the House of Commons, on Tuesday, against the complaints that the Board had dealt too dras- tically with the Irish cattle trade in the matter of the foot-and-mouth disease restrictions. Speaking on the Board of Agriculture vote, he said the Board had not been so strict as many of the English Couuty Councils, and he thought these Councils would now do well to take the advice of the Board and remove the prohibitions on Irish cattle. If it was thought well to have a Committee of stockowners and others interested to advise the Board on the subject ho would welcome such advice, but the ultimate decision must rest with the Department. The latest news from Ireland was reassuring, and they were only awaiting a final message from the Irish Department's chief veterinary officer before allowing the cattle traffic to be resumed. The recent outbreak of this disease had upset the export trade of Ifcgland for five or six months. Scotland had secured immunity from this disability, and Scotch animals had been going out without interruption. Negotiations were proceeding with the Argentine Government with the object of securing a reduction of the period of six months now insisted upon before animals were admitted after the Department of Agriculture had been able to declare the country free from disease. Foot-and-mouth disease bads nob, however, involved the country in losses anything like as large as those which had come from swine fever, which during the last generation had been the most persistent of all animil diseases. I la the last fire months the number of outbmka had graufcer than last year, and the had paid £82000 in compensation in 1913-14. while in the same period the administration of the Department in connection with swine fever had cost 965,000 over about 2,900 cases of the disease. Our method of dealing with the disease was at least as satisfactory as those in America and other countries. On the question of small holdings, Mr Runciman said the movement had shown no signs of breaking down. There were in the country 11,000 small holders, in addition to 1.400 holders under associations, and over 196,000 acres of land had been secured or were being negotiated for. Over 24,000,000 had been invested in these small holdings, and £ 60,000 a year was paid in rent. There were still over 6.000 approved applicants unsatisfied. Mr C Bathurst said the policy of whole- sale slaughter amounted to a confession of departmental ignorance and failure. It was lamentable to find the serious lack of co- operation between the Board of Agriculture in England and the department of Agriculture in Ireland, and he asserted that this led to a complete want in confidence in both departments by British farmers. Cattle diseases should be dealt with by a single body acting over the whole country. In his opinion the existing swine fever order was a failure. Mr T W Russell, of the Irish Department of Agriculture, said their inspectors had definitely declared that the animals suspected at Belfast were not suffering from foot-and-mouth disease. Mr Hicks Beach and Mr Orumley advocated a reduction of the restrictions preventing the movement of cattle from Ireland. Captain Pretyman complained of recent financial legislation, and urged the need of security for capital invested in agriculture. The debate was interrupted by the motion for adjournment. -———— —————

[No title]

AMOSit THE TABLE. r

[No title]

Advertising

GUARDIANS ELECTION AT ! COLWALL.…

DEATH OF AN OLD INHABITANT,…

PENDOCK. I

Advertising

[No title]