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SPORTS AND PASTIMESI

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WORK AND WORKERS. I

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ACROSS THE TABLR I

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ACROSS THE TABLR I Was ever such cosmopolitan Derby as that of this year? Mr. H. B. Duryea, the owner of Durbar II., the winner, an American mag- nate who trains in France; Sir Ernest Cassel, the owner of the second, Hapsburg, famous tie a financier the world over; Mr. II. J. King, whose Peter the Hermit was third, a South African mine owner. Maegee, who rode Durbar II., was born in Kentucky, and Murphy, its trainer, is an Irish-American. The horse itself is of English pedigree, being eired by Rabelais, which carried the colours of Mr. Arthur James in many of our big races; and its dam, Armenia, was shipped years ago from England to America, and thence transported to France, where Dur- bar II. was born. No race equals the Derby in the ardour of its devotees. John Scott, who trained sixteen St. Leger and five Blue Riband winners, saw no fewer than fifty-four Derbys, and his fami- liar figure was never once missing from Epsom on Derby Day for thirty-four consecu- tive years. Palmerston saw fifty Derbys, as also did John Gully, the prize-fighter M.P., and James Weatherby, a sporting journalist, who used to declare he wouldn't miee the Derby to attend his own funeral," did not miss the race a single time from 1828 to 1894. Mr. Healy's reference to the privilege of Peeas in connection with the canteen case the other day may be supplemented by the re- minder that it is not in every case that a Peer is tried by his fellows. This is his privilege in cases of treason or felony, but where the matter is one of misdemeanour he has no special rights. Such trials are rare nowadays, the last case being that of Lord Russell ior bigamy. In such trials every Peer, beginning with the junior Baron, has to stand in his place and give his verdict "on my honour." The Glasgow Dairy Company were charged the other day with failing to give a weekly half-holiday to one of their employees engaged in selling milk in the street from a cart, and because the cart was net a shop" in the strictest sense of the term the Sheriff dis- missed the case as irrelevant. So it comes to this, comments the Edinburgh Dispatch, that street vendors may take up their stance on the Tuesday or Wednesday afternoon oppo- site a closed shop door and sell the very goods which the shopkeeper is prohibited from sell- ing. It was contended for the defence that the intention of the Legislature in providing a weekly half-holiday for shop assistants was to ensure their freedom from confinement, but the Legislature in its haste did not reckon with the itinerant merchant, who, according to Sheriff Thompson, may continue to sell when the shopkeeper must cease. A good story of Parnell, illustrating his force of will and his power over his followers, which docs not find a place in the much-dis- i by the editor of tile cussed biography, is told by the editor of the Newspaper World, who was once in the smoking-room of the House of Commons with Mr. Mark Oldrovd (then Member for Dews- bury) when Parnell came in. Now you will see something," said Mr. Oldroyd. These Irishmen in the corner will have to turn out." As Parnell approached the corner he made a sideways motion with his hand, and immedi- ately the four or five Home Rule Members in his corner rose and walked away with- out word or gesture. That is discipline," remarked Mr. Oldroyd. How many of us would have earned this shilling? asks a writer in the Daily Mirror. A Hyde Park orator the other afternoon offered 10s. to any member of his congrega- tion who could recite without hesitation the names of the twelve Apostles. No one ac- cepted the challenge. Then the speaker tempted fortune further—and fell. He offered a shilling for four, permitting only one at- tempt from the whole of his audience. "Mat- thew, Mark. Peter, John," said a wise one- and got the shilling. But before he uttered the name Peter I heard the sound of an in- cipient "L." And the speaker noticed it, too. "I am glad you remembered Luke was not an apostle," he said. "Yes," replied the wise one, pocketing his shilling and moving away, and I'm glad you forgot that Mark wasn't one, either." Then some of the crowd smiled. Mr. Marconi has been recalling the fact that when wireless telegraphy was first mooted the Admiralty authorities of the day expressed the opinion that a range of ten or fifteen miles would be quite sufficient for all purposes. History repeats itself. When, some half a century earlier, the electric tele- graph was invented, the Admiralty of the day showed their appreciation of its possibilities by making reply, when invited to utilise tho new method of communication for naval pur- poses: "We have already an excellent sema- phore system." The late Mr. Herbert Spencer was fond of citing this episode as a classical instance of officialdom's attitude to. wards new ideas. In a few days there will be only one Lom- bard-street in the City of London. Few people probably know that there are two at present. The great centre of banking, of course, is known to all the world; but now many know a narrow court of the name which runs off Fleet street parallel to Bouverie- etreet? No banks are there, but a bricky monotony of printing establishments. But the London County Council now proclaim notice that this street shall henceforth be known only as a lane. «

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MARKETS. I

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

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REVIEW OF THE CORN TRADE.

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