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SPORTS AND PASTIMESI

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SPORTS AND PASTIMES I An invitation has been received for British officers to attend the Interrational Horse Show to be held at The Hague from June 23rd to 23th. The names of officers desiring to take part should be submitted through the vsual channel not later than June 10th. Captain E. D. Miller, who has done so much for English polo, haes undertaken the management of the polo section of the 'Panama Pacific ^Exposition of 1915. It is a gratifying announcement to all those who have the interests of the game at heart, says tthe Ref eree. It is a piece of good fortune also for the powers that be, for Captain Miller, in his long association with the sport. ■fox's proved himself a master in the matter of organisation. Perhaps his gifts are largely due to his wide experience. He has played polo nearly everywhere in the world where .polo flourishes. This polo carnival must be a .great event. It may lay the foundation for An international polo contest under much -wider conditions than those represented by the Anglo-American Cup, and it would be greatly to the interests of the game, in --world-wide sense, if it did. Men and women gymnasts to the number of 3,€00 took part in a national gymnastic (display at the Crystal Palace on Saturday. They marched from the Palace to the foot- ball ground, where Admiral Sir E. R. Fre- mantle took the salute. Two thousand one hundred women gave a splendid massed dis- play of free exercises. This was followed by set exercises by men and women. Two hun- dred societies, gymnasia, and classes took part in the display, which was watched by a very large crowd. A world's record rifle score was made at Bisley on the long ranges, 800, 900, and 1,000 yards, on Saturday afternoon. There was a splendid light and no wind, and Mr. W. F. Willey, of the Stock Exchange Rifle Club, totalled 102-a highest possible of 35 at 800 yards, 34 at 900 yards, and 33 at 1,000 yards. Mr. Winfield Thompson holds a high opinion of Shamrock IV. He feels confident, eaya the Times, that she will prove faster than any of the three American craft, and the Asne of the races next September will depend largely upon time allowance, which will be a much more important factor than in previous contests. Mr. Thompson arrived in this country recently from America, and is in the unique position of having seen all the Ameri- can defence yachts as well as the challenger. Should Resolute, the Herreshoff boat, be chosen as defender, she would claim probably about nine minutes' allowance from Sham- xock IV. over the thirty-mile course, on ac- count of her small canvas spread. James Paddon, the Australian sculler, who will meet Ernest Barry on the Thames for the world's championship, is expected to arrive in this country this week. Within the last year Paddon has placed two triumphs to his credit. On the first occasion he beat Felton for the championship of Australia, and on the second he was much too good for Barry's old .opponent, Dick Arnst. In fact, Barry and Paddon are the only scullers who have ever defeated Arnst on level terms. The chal- lenger for the title is a giant in stature. He is 6ft. 3in. in height, and built in proportion, though there are those who say that, from the point of view of symmetry, his arms are unduly long. But even these critics agree, eays the Evening News, that this will not in- terfere with his effectiveness as & sculler. Colin Bell, an Australian boxer, is over in this country for the purpose of meeting Bom- bardier Wells and contesting for the heavy- weight championship of the British Empire. Articles have also been signed for a match with Carpentier, but the date has not yet been fixed. It is Bell's ambition to meet Jack Johnson and endeavour to wrest from him the heavy weight championship of the world The professionals who will. play the first tennis match on a court made of plantation rubber are Messrs. H. Cowdray and C. Hierons. This will take place at the Agricul- tural Hall, Islington, on the 24th of this month, after the opening of the International Rubber and Allied Industries and the Inter- national Cotton, Fibres, and Products of the Soil of Tropical and Sub-Tropical Countries Exhibitions. Dealing with the present conditions under which the Lawn Tennis Championship is played at Wimbledon, the editor of Ayres Lawn Tennis Almanack" points out the baneful consequences of playing three cham- pionship events. It may be urged," he adds, "that players are not obliged to enter for three events, or even two. But if an event be termed a championship it should be held at a time and under conditions when the players most worthy to win the title are not handicapped by their exertions in other events." The author remarks that neither the public nor the majority of players de- mand the holding of two championship meetings, but what they jointly desire is a revised scheme which will make for fairness all round. A prominent, and not altogether satisfac- tory, feature of this year's golf championships, writes Pharamond in the Beffree, is the lieavy wagering which has taken place in con- nection with them. It. is very difficult, of course, to say where the line shall be drawn, and there does not, on the face of it. seem to be anything less derogatory in a turf accoun- tant circularising golfers, and, presumably as s* hnll-nv-rk of respectability, mentioning that he is a member of certain well-known golf clubs, than in a member of a recognised pro- fession competing in the championship and opening a book on it. Systematic bookmak- ing, imported into any form of athletic sport, ■lias never yet accomplished anything but liarm, and there is no good reason to suppose that golf would prove to be an c-xccptidn ft the rule. At a largely attended meeting of the com- mittee of the Staines Amateur Regatta, held at the Staines Boat Club, it was unanimously decided that the regatta, which is one of the oldest on the Thames, should be continued from 1915, provided the. Thames Amateur Rowing Council can be induced to fix a suit- able date on which the regatta can be held. It is hoped, therefore, that the Council will seriously consider the advisability of meeting the views of the Regatta Committee. A Lancaster correspondent sends the follow- ing remarkable story: Mr. W. T. Charlton, secretary of tho Lancaster and District Ang- ling Association, has had an unusual experi- ence whilst fishing on Blea Tarn—the largest of the Lancaster Corporation reservoirs. He liad hooked a small trout, and was abort to land it, when it was surldenlv seized by a large trout of five or çix rtoivrls in weight. The .x ;In w e-Ig h t The large fish seized the s^nller ore bv the middle r-cl 1.}<1 it as a tavrier would hold a rat. JTrenhiailv it n off with it" wev, and Mr., VII I to, let "t line, s reeling vn v. Wh»n he got a ight of the larce fi"b he fouid it hnd swallowed the smaller rino. Ire played it wjtl1 the view of landing jt. Wh'D drawn fr)- the ?We. however, it dis- fto~^ed its prev. but immediately re"t.tneked it, f-rl r, In-,Idl off r-itli the mall fi^h. Again r. Charlie" fat out lilne. and in d'le course drew in. the big fish had orce the fish. :1 rrr;¡,r, "1-.1>,1 it round the re-^rvnir town-<? the inlet i" the hope that fforr.nnrp on th-, road would come to his :a"+."I" Tn the pniirpf of tn" contest-, nearly 'wo hours, the big fish fcotterl f"" smaller on" fmr or five times, and pr, qn-d M- <ld eit-he7* hook it or ;+ Tim "111" ,1, w" nlrrost torn to {I, Tiip kf/r stamps of the J f Scr'1'1- V Vv r> mTil 110"tM::In and f fboth of whom had a good view of the large fish.

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REVIEW OF THE CORN TRADE.

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