Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

SPORTS AND PASTIMES.I

Advertising

WORIC AND WORKERS. I

Advertising

CORN TRADE REVIEW. I -'-PEVFENII.I

Detailed Lists, Results and Guides
Cite
Share

CORN TRADE REVIEW. I -PEVFENII I FIVE MONTHS' PiUCIS CHANGES. The fall in temperature in England, France and the Low Countries has been sufficient to check the growth of wheat and spring corn. Rainfall has not been adequate in any of the chief regions of North-West Europe, and if no moisture is experienced over the Whitsun holidays trade will resume on June 3rd with a strong disposition to go dearer for British produce, also for what French farmers still hold of their 1913 corn. The advices from regions further afield are mostly highly favourable, the Board of Agriculture on the 27tli returning winter wheat as 15 per cent. above the average in Roumania, 12 in the United States, and 10 in Spain. Barley and oats are 10 per cent, above an average pro- mise both in Roumania and in Spain, while I. Russia and Italy are credited with average expectations of all the cereals. Some. price changes between New- Year's I DfY and Whitsuntide, representing five months' trade, may thus be summarised 1. English win at.: about a norm net re- covery on the qu'uter. 2. Canadian whc'at: a like advance. 2. C,iiiadiaii \viie-,it a 'ike 4. American wheat: 6:1. per cental advance, but some signs of reaction now apparent. 5. English barley: very little. change, trade poor. 6. Russian barley: Is. (i:l. per qr. net advance, S. Ma e 2s. Cd. per (jr. advance, but the sales are now severely checked by the price asked. 9. Beet sugar: 7d. per ewt. net recovery from the ^xitreiaely low price of New Year's Day still leaves value below LOs. per cwt., which is the lowest possible price at which it can be grown for profit in this country. 10. Linseed: 2s. fid. per qr. advance. But this staple, like beet sugat, still remains a de- cided bargain. 11. Egyptian cottonseed has fallen quite a sovereign per ton in the five months, and should now pay to buy, which it hardly did at the New Year. 12. Rice is 4d. per cwt. down on the period. It rose 5d. from January 1st to January 24tl1, fell 6d. from January 24 nh to February 14tli, rose 4d. between then and Easter. It is there- fore a capricious market, largely dependent on the weekly telegrams from Rangoon and Saigon. 13. Top price flour: hardily changed. 14. Household flour: Is. per sack dearer. 15. American flour: Is. to Is. 6d. per sack dearer. 16. Fine mi(?.d]im:s: a little dearer. 17. Bran: Irregularly cheaper. In reply to inquiries, we may state that our quotations always refer, unless otherwise stated, to the nnJm-ül or untreated article. Thus, some who have thought cur prices too low for marrowfat peas, and also for cotton- seed oil, have enclosed circulars which, on our referring to them, nre in perfect a.fjree- merit; with our price?, the explanation being that they quote in the one case the peas after being hand-picked, and in the other the oil after being refined. In our last issue it may be noted that* in one passage cotton- seed was printed where cloverseed was neces- I sary. Happily, the context will have pre- vented confusion, fcr cottonseed never ap- pears in a list of farm seeds. BRITISH GRAIN PRICES. I British wheat prices s how that counties may be thus grouped Paying 34s. and over Middlesex, Surrey, Bedford, Oxford, Kent, Leicester.. Nottingham. Paying 32s. and over: Suffplk, Norfolk, Fenland, Yoykshire. Paying under 32s. Northumberland, Dur- ham, Cambridge, Dorset. British barley is exceptionally cheap, 21s. to 25s. in Dorset, Sussex. Yorkshire, and Norfolk, but is fetching 26s. and over in Cambridge, Suffolk, and in the west and north. Low medium prices, 25s. to 26s. pre- vail at Mark-lane and in the Home Counties. British oats have reached an average of a sovereign or over in Middlesex, Surrey, Bed- ford, Cambridge, and at a few western mar- kets, but they remained depressed in Suf- folk. The far north shows some rally. The sales have been singularly small at lInn, usually the second in rank of the markets, London, of course, being the chief for this cereal. SALES AT STATUTE MARKETS. Sales of British wheat at the 180 statute markets for the thirty-eight completed weeks of the harvest year, beginning September 1st, show good business done at a slight fall in price This season, 2,359.0,00qr. at 31s. 3d. per qr; last season, 1,973,,0,00qr. at 31s. 9d. per qr. Sales of British barley reveal the attraction exerted by a low price. The stocks of old barley appear to be exceedingly reduced: T li i ?, seasoii ")c at 27s. 2d. per qr.; last season, 2,456.OOOqr. at„«8s. 10 per qr. The returns of oats are ofs little value, but a certain interest attaches to a comparison between season and season: This season, 67-f5.000ar. at 18s. fid. per qr.; last season, 570 OOOqr. at 19s. 9d. per or. No average is now struck on rye, but the price ran Fed from 24s. to 25s. per qr. re- cently, and is now a little higher. IMPORTS OF BREADSTUFFS. Imports to date show somewhat remarkable figures for breadstuffs for the past four weeks: Mav. Wants. Imnorts. 1—6 530,000 40S-.000qr. 6—13 53-0.000 335.000 „ 13-20 530.000 389.0Q{)" 1 20-27 530.000 388,000 We reckon farmers to have supplied 100,fl<4)qr. a week, find the total wants to be 630,OOOqr. weekly. The four weeks show a joint and serious deficiency which should make the June markets naturally strong. Stocks fell 122,000qr. in the first week, 195,OOOqr. in the second week, 141,OOOqr. in the third week, and 142,MDqr. in the fourth week, in all 600,OOOqr. in less than a month. Imports of breadstuffs present figures equally remarkable. Reckoning maize needs at 200,000qr. weekly, we have SM,000qr. re- quired and only 450,000qr. imported. Of bar- ley we need quite 125,OOOqr. weekly from abroad, and we have received much less; four weeks' need not less than 600,OOOqr. and im- ports 270,OOOqr. Oats show 600,OOOqr. needed and 440,000qr. j,mported.-Mark Lane Express.

Advertising

CURKKNT PRICES OF BRTTfSH…

Advertising

I AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

Advertising

SAVED BY ATTACK OF MEASLES.…