Hide Articles List

13 articles on this Page

Advertising

MARKETS.I

Advertising

AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

Advertising

SPORTS AND PASTIMES.

[No title]

WORK AND WORKERS.I

News
Cite
Share

WORK AND WORKERS. I It is announced at Crewe that the London and North-Western Railway Company- have made concessions to their 80,000 employees, of whom about 9,000 are clerks. For some time there has been an agitation for greater railway facilities, and the company have now intimated that in future free tickets will be allowed to all the clerical staff, both wages and salaried, on three occasions during the year; also to their wives and all children earning less than 15s. per week. A free pass will also be granted to the salaried staff once a year over the lines of other railway com- panies; also to two dependent children. Resi- dential passes will also be granted to junior clerks, wages and salaried, in receipt of not more than £ 40 per annum, also free tickets to juniors visiting their homes at week-ends. Free passes will in future be granted, annually to all men in their works at Crewe, Wolver- ton, and Earlstown, numbering over 20,000. Their wives and families will also participate in this privilege. The delegates of the Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen, at their Leeds Conference on Saturday, unanimously passed a resolution practically vetoing the principle of fusion which has so long been agitated at the meetings of that body. It was also unanimously decided to demand that the words competent pilotmen" in the com- panies' orders be altered to pilot driver." and that the Union officials should approach the companies and the Board of Trade on the matter. Advances in wages ranging from Is. to 3s. weekly, affecting nearly 3.000 workers, are contained in the award of the North-Eastern Railway Conciliation Board lately issued. The concession is also made to some sections •of a six days' working week. I The London branch of the Postal Telegraph Clerks' Association has notified provincial branches that the special events staff" have refused to sign for duty at race meetings on June 1st at the reduced rates for mainten- ance allowance. The cause is the decision of the Postmaster-General to reduce the sub- sistence allowance from 6d. per hour to 4d. per hour, which is paid to telegraphists when away from home on official business. The re- duced rate becomes operative on June 1st. It is stated that the Postmaster-General is re- considering his decision, and that the tele- graphists hope to induce him to return to the old rate. Speaking at a great miners' meeting at Aberdare. Mr. William Brace, M.P., presi- dent of the South Wales Miners' Federation, remarked that next year they would pass through a crisis. For the first time in their history all their agreements would terminate —the Conrciliation Board agreement and the Minimum Wage Act. They were demanding 50 per cent. on the standard rate of 1879. and they were going to have no maximum. Their experience showed that they were not able to share in the great prosperity of their em- ployers. The men had given the employers notice of their demands in time to enable them to make provision in their contracts for 1915, and to meet their demands. If the em- ployers did not do this, it was because they contemplated fighting the miners' protective organisations. Greater wages and safety must come before employers' dividends. A hundred and ninety-three miners em- ployed at Dawdon Colliery were summoned at Seaham Harbour Police-court for leaving work without notice. There were five days involved, some of the men being summoned in respect to the whole and others to three and two days. The sum of 5s. damages per day was claimed. The matter arose with the putters, and there was a dispute regarding the minimum wage, and at length the whole colliery, employing 1,500 hands, was laid idle, involving, according to the prosecution, a loss to the owners of about £ 1,000. After over forty orders for damages had been made, the bulk of the defendants, not satisfied, left the court in a body, and after the fiftieth tease the Bench adjourned the remainder for fourteen days. The men marched to the court headed by a brass band and with banners flying. Less than a quarter of them could be accom- modated in the court. The summons in re- spect to one of the defendants was dismissed. He was the president of the Dawdon Lodge, and proved that his absence on the two dates for which Ihe was summoned was due to lodge 'business. The Farmers' Union of Kent recently wrote to Mr. Lloyd George urging that his proposal for a minimum wage for agricultural labourers would be unworkable in the Kent fruit and hop districts, where piece rates are the rtne. The following reply has now been received from the Chancellor's secretary: "With re- gard to the question of piecework and the minimum wage, referred to in your letter, I aa requested by the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer to point out that this question can easily be dealt with on similar lines to those adopted under the Trade Boards Act. Under this Act the Board may fix minimum piece rates, and where piece rates are not fixed by the Board the employer shall be deemed to pay wages at less than the minimum rate un- less he can show that the piece rate of wages paid by him would yield in the circumstances of the case, to an ordinary worker, at least the same amount of money as the minimum time rate (Section 8). Hence, in those trades where the minimum piece rates have not been fixed the employer has to show that ordinary workers receive a wage which is up to the minimum time rate; but it is not necessary for him to show that the piece rate wlrfch he has fixed yields to every worker, however slow and incapable, an amount equivalent to the mini- mum time rate. Nor. on the other hand, is it sufficient for him to show that the piece rate which he had fixed will yield the equivalent of the minimum time rate in the case of the specially fast worker." A Conference, convened bv the London Trades Council, was held at Essex Hall on Saturday, for the purpose of founding a Lon- don Labour Party for capturing as many seats as possi-ble for Trade Unionists and Socialists at the L.C.C. elections in 1916. Mr. J. Stokes (Glassblowers' Union) presided. Mr. Fred Knee (secretary) said that up to the pre- sent the working-class movement in London was divided, and it was the object of the Conference to unite them. What they would have to do was to form what was called on the Continent a bloc party, in which nobody should be top dog and no one bottom dog. At present there were only seven Labour Mem- bers on the County Council. They were divided into three sections. Of the seven one only could be called a Labour representative by courtesy in virtue of his position as secre- tary to a Union. All this had to be ended. He appealed to them to sink all differences, and let the ideal of working-class unity stand before them as one to be gloried in, aimed at, and achieved. If they were firm and united Tie looked to securing at least fifty seats at the next election. The resolution was adopted. A provisional Committee of ten was apPf);nftod' to dn.ft a constitution for the proposed Ion- don Labour Party, and report to a meeting to be held not later than Jurif 13th. A resolu- tion was also carried constituting the Confer- ence as the first session of the London Labour party. A settlement of the galvanisers' strike at Mersey Ironworks. Ellesmere Port, was ar- rived at on Saturday, and the men returned to work on Monday. The firm have recog- nise the union, and will confer with the officials on several long-standing grievances. Strikers on Saturday received strike pay for the first time in the firm's history, extending over forty years. A meeting of Manchester tramway em- ployees was held in the Lesser Free Trade Hall at one o'clock on Sunday morning to consider replies received from the manage- ment of the Manchester Corporation Tram- ways to certain grievance* under which they allege they suffer. At the close of a three hours' discussion it was resolved that the pro- gramme of the management contained in the replies be rejected as unsatisfactory.

Advertising

CHIPS OF NEWS. I

[No title]

REVIEW OF THE CORN «TIiADE.

Advertising