Hide Articles List

13 articles on this Page

Advertising

MARKETS.I

Advertising

AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

Advertising

SPORTS AND PASTIMES.

News
Cite
Share

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. The competition at Henley this year pro- mises to be of an international character in the leading events, and the publication of the "list of Colonial and foreign entries, which close on June- 1st, will be awaited with some interest, says an Observer writer. It is quite dikely that England will have to fight hard to tretain the Grand Challenge Cup for eights -and the Stewards' Challenge Cup for fours. It appears practically certain that the /United States will send two eights for the Crund Challenge Cup. The Union Club, of 'Boston, and an eight from Harvard University will compete. This is stated to .be the Har- IVard second boat that met with great success at the American Henley. No Harvard crew "has ever been seen at Henley, but in 1906 harvard rowed' a match against Cambridge -University over the Boat Race course and suffered defeat. The Boston Union Boat Club crew will be made up entirely of Harvard graduates who have rowed in the University moat, so that quite a big party or Harvard anen will be over, and they may count on a swarn) welcome. The American Rowing Association, which las secured an agreement with the Henley executive, must not be confused with the 4Katiorial Association of Amateur Oarsmen of the United States. The former was formed to -run the American Henley, but more recently widened the scope of its operations by affiliat- ing the best clubs in the States, including the leading Universities. The other outside entries will include <he Winnipeg R.C. eight for the Grand and a couple of Canadian scullers for the Dia- monds, including R. Dibble, of the Don R.C., Toronto, who is the holder of the amateur sculling championship of America. The Mainzer Ruder Verein, of Mayence, will again send a four for the Stewards' Cup, and possibly an eight for the Grand. Last year the Mayence four defeated the Argonaut (Toronto) and Leander in the Stewards' Cup, but lost the final to New College on a foul, the Germans steering very erratically and colliding with their opponents. So far as the home entries are concerned, Xeander, London, and Thames may be reck- oned as certainties for the Grand. The 'Var- sity entries will depend to some extent on the Tesults of the Summer Eights, but it is antici- pated that a combined Trinity (First and Third) crew and Jesus will represent Cam bridge in the Grand, whilst New College will most likely be the only Oxford entry. Leander, Thames, London, and New College are probables for the Stewards' Cup. There will be a big contingent of college crews for the Ladies' Plate and Thames Cup, and Eton, Radley, Shrewsbury, and Beaumont are expected to represent school rowing in the Ladies' "Lord Wimborne and the members of the English polo team left Liverpool for New York on Saturday in the Carmania. It would be absurd to say I am confident of the result," said Lord Wimborne, but I have a much better team than I anticipated I would have a few days ago. If we can get the team thoroughly together we may put up a better game than we thought." The demand for Beats for the polo matches at New York is so great that extra stands are being erected to accommodation a total of 47,000 persons. It is confidently expccted that next year's international polo meeting at San Francisco will be the biggest thing of its kind ever attempted. Every effort is to be made to make it really representative of polo in every part of the world. Mr. J. Cheever Cowdin and Mr. John B. Miller, the special commis- sioners who were recently in London, are now on the Continent arranging for the visit to San Francisco of teams from France, Spain, Germany, and Austria. The British War Office is to be approached to grant permission to officers to compete in the open Army events, and an invitation is also to be sent by the United States Government to India to secure the attendance of native teams. The travelling expenses of ponies and the grooms in charge of them are being paid by the ex- position management. Another name has been written on the scroll of golfing honours, says the Observer. It is the name of Mr. J. L. C. Jenkins, a player well known in the Troon district and scarcely so well known elsewhere. Mr. Jen- tins has on several occasions worthily repre- sented his country in international matches, and has gone some distance in previous championships. For some time he has been knocking at the door of golfing fame, and on Saturday it opened to him. Mr. Jenkins is a short, alert man of thiry-one,very self-pos- sessed, very confident, with a command over every shot that has to be played. In the championship he beat in turn Mr. Castle, Mr. Munn, the two Martin Smiths, Mr. H. E. Hambro, the Hon. M. Scott, and Mr. Norman Hunter. The runner-up is Mr. C. O. Hezlet, whose mother and sisters have figured so soften in ladies' championship meetings. So numerous are the entries in the 108 classes of the International Horse Show, which opens on June 4th at Olympia, that it will be necessary to hold three performances on each of the eleven days. The mornings will be devoted to preliminary judging, so that a weeding-out process will leave only the best of the animals to be dealt with during the afternoon. This reduces waits, and leaves more time for varying the programme. When it is known that in each of the jumping classes there is an average entry of seventy horses, it will be realised that the judges have no light task before them. and their work will extend from 10 a.m. until midnight, and possibly later. I There is every prospect that all parts of the British Empire will be represented at the Bisley meeting in July next. Oversea contin- gents are expected from India, Australia, Canada, South Africa, New Zealand, Rho- desia, the East African Protectorates, Egypt and the Soudan, the China Ports, Burmah and the Straits, the Mediterranean, Ceylon, the West Indies, West Africa, and the Chan- nel Islands. The All-Indian team, which has been raised by Major W. Donald Smith, Madras Volunteer Guards, is now on its way to England in the P. and O. steamship Nubia. Very interesting was t Ie programe of the London Athletic Club's spring meeting at Stamford Bridge on Saturday. One encourag- ing result, in view of the Olympic Games, was the performance of F. O. Kitching, of the promoting club, at throwing the javelin. He won that event at 143ft. 3in., by far the best recorded achievement of its kind by a native- born Englishman in England. At throwing the discus also A. E. Flaxman (L.A.C.), the hammer-throwing ex-champion, did well. He won that event at 115ft. lOlin., beating the old Oxford University" blue," W. E. B. Henderson (L.A.C.), by 3-2 Ift E. W. Haley won the club's quarter-mile champion ship somewhat easily in 51sec. C. N. Seed house, the quarter-mile ex-champion, had-, sent in his name for this event after a long absence from the path, but he arrived from his home at Newmarket just too late to com. pete. Captain H. E. H. Blakenev (L.A.C.), an Army ex-champion, won the 300 yardE hurdles handicap from scratch in 39sec. E. W. Britton, Ashcombe A.C., was doubly successful by winning the 100 yards open" handicap, with eight yards start, in 10 l-5sec., and the 220 yards handicap, with 15.} yards start, in 23sec. In the absence of H. Shelton (holder) F. de B. Collenette won the club's mile challenge quite easily in 4min. 37sec. The finest bit of running throughout the afternoon was shown by B. Ives, the Queen's Park Harriers hon. secretary, in the two miles "open" handicap. Starting from the virtual scratch mark of 65 yards, he rapidly cut down the field, and, getting the lead 300 yards from home, won by 18 yards from H. Taylor (Geneva A.C.), 220 yards start, in the fast time of 9min. 28 2-5sec.

[No title]

WORK AND WORKERS.I

Advertising

CHIPS OF NEWS. I

[No title]

REVIEW OF THE CORN «TIiADE.

Advertising