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PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND…

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CYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLEI…

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PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.…

LOSS IN WEIGHT OF EGGS DURING…

-WYE TRAGEDY.I

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INVESTIGATING SWINE FEvzp. There has been considerable discussion lately on the question of swine fever, and the merits of the serum treatment have been considered, it is to be feared, not always relevantly to the value of innoculation as disclosed by reports from other countries. The situation is unquestionably rendered more difficult, and the issue more obscure, by the sharp criticism levelled by men of science against the efforts put forth by those who have control of the disease to extend our knowledge of it. It is contended that the attention given to veterinary science is ludi- crously inadequate, and that matters which affect domestic stock should come uuder the scrutiny of the pathologist, biologist, miscro- scopist, chemist, and agriculturist, so that by joint efforts, definite results might be obtained. The system of Government research, it is claimed, has certain apparent defects, and there seems no reason whatever, provided the money can be raised, why such highly equipped re- search institutions as Cambridge University should not take a share in the prosecution of investigation. Field experiments, of course, cannot be carried out promiscuously, and must be under the supervision of the authorities who control contagious disease. But it is not on record that sanction for these has been definitely refused, if indeed it has been asked. There is a strong movement amongst breeders of pigs who are dissatisfied with the state of things in favour of widening the basis of research. It is held that administrative duties are too exacting to run concurrently with careful supervision of delicate experiments, and that the latter should be placed in the hands of those whose entire time is spent in the laboratory. There should be no technical objection to experimentation on a large scale, s the cost of swine fever exceeds £ 100,000 annually, and its suppression would be a direct saving to the State, and an immense boon to the pig breeding industry. Un- fortunately the figures representing the number of outbreaks do not furnish an accurate re- trospect, as the small pig owner has been in later times supplanted by those who have some claim to be called pig breeders. Therefore the actual number of outbreaks probably affects a larger number of pigs than was formerly the case. Whatever element of truth is embodied in the statements made with respect to serum treatment history will record, but there are no two opinions held about the desirability of a deeper insight into the disease. Steps hasten- ing that end should be commendeclo

THE MEAIf LITTLE BILL.

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