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PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND…

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CYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLEI…

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PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.…

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PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE. i By RALPH R ALLEN, Lecturer to the Herts County Council; Editor of Monthly Hints on Poultry, Ac. (All rights reserved.) A SUCCESSFUL BREEDING SEASON. I (CONTINUED.) [Readers are particularly requested to note that this series of articles commenced with the first issue in January. In order to obtain their full value, the earlier articles should be read in conj unction with the current one.] VENTILATION DURING INCUBATION. I Under this heading many incubators are I lamentably weak. During the process of incubation the development germs absorb oxygen and emit carbon dioxide, or carbonic acid gas as it is more commonly known. If the latter is allowed to accumulate it stands to reason that the germs are weakened in fact, a well-known American expert. Professor Horace Atwood, states: It is my impression that bowel trouble and non-absorption of the contents of the yolk-sac—two very common ailments of incubator chicks-are frequently caused by lack of fresh air in the incubating chamber during the hatch." Plenty of fresh air, then, is necessary but even ventilation can be overdone. This brings us to THE MOISTURE QUESTION. I Too much ventilation means that the eggs will evaporate too quickly, causing the chicks to dry fast to the shell, producing cripples and destroying others. Vice versa, if sufficient evaporation does not take place, the chicks are weaklings, and have insufficient room to break their shell and so make good their escape. The difficulty, then, that confronts us is, what is the happy medium as regards evaporation during incubation to produce best results ? More attention has been paid to the solution of this in the United States of America than in this country. Over there it has been brought down to a hard and fast rule, whilst with us it has been left to the skill (or lack of it) of the operator, with about 50 per cent. of luck. I cannot do better than reproduce an extract from bulletin No. 73 which was issued by the U.S.A. Government, portions of which have been quoted by Professor Horace Atwood, in an able article which he contributed to the Reliable Poultry Journal on this subject. Experiments which I have personally conducted coincide with thes- results but, they have gone more deeply j lito the matter than time and opportunity have permitted me. The extract from bulletin No 73 is as follows :—

LOSS IN WEIGHT OF EGGS DURING…

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THE MEAIf LITTLE BILL.

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