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CRICKET CHAT. I

LEDBURY v. WITHINGTON. I

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[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] BIBLE…

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[DYMOCK. )

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ITHE GLOUCESTER YEOMANRY TRAINING.

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IACROSS THE TABLE.

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I ACROSS THE TABLE. Some curious (lections, writer a correspot- deut, are implied by the list of their Majes- ties' relations to whom the words "members of the Royal Fmnih apply in respect of tJw Army Dress Regulations. Thus it appears that, for official purposes, the Prince oi Wales is the only one of the children of the King and Queen who belongs to the Royal Family-- neither Princess Mary, Prince Albert, nor the three .youngest sons being included in the War Office list. Another point to be noted is that the list omits the King's relatives who have married into foreign Royal houses. When Mr. Speaker asked Mr. Ponsonby in the House the other night whether he had obtained the Royal consent to the bringing in of his bill for the abolition of hereditary titles, he was alluding, says the West-minuter Gazette, to the constitutional practice by which all bills affecting the prerogative or the personal interests of the Sovereign must receive the consent of the Crown. In ordinary cases there is no need that this shall be signified on the earlier stages, and the third reading is the most usual time. There is, however, one class of bills where the Royal consent is required at the earliest stage. This is necessary in all bills for the re- versing of attainders, the restitution of honours, and the restitution of blood—the exact opposite, in fact, of Mr. Ponsonby's bill. Should there be any failure to obtain the Royal consent before the passing of a bill re- quiring it, then all proceedings on that bill become null and void, and this has actually happened more than once in the past. The Crown is the Fountain of Honour, and any bill doing away with titles must affect the prerogative. Probably no one is more likely to bring the Transatlantic flight to a successful conclusion than Mr. Hamel. He is one of the most brilliant flying men in the world, but he is much more than that, says the Globe. He is daring without being reckless or ever playing to the gallery, and never embarks on an enter- prise without having thoroughly weighed the risks and the chances, and leaving nothing to luck. The mere fact that an airman of his calibre should have definitely decided to make the attempt shows how soon a flight across the Atlantic will be a matter of practical politics. I passed a shop the other day that declares itself about to open for the sale of "head- wear," says a Daily Mirror writer. Why headwear; why not hats? A little late. I saw a display of "neckwear," and further on an advertisement of the newest style in foot- wear," beneath which was an announcement of ready-for-service" garments. Why on earth could not these people have called their goods collars and ties, boots, and ready-made clothes 7 That is what they were. But there are people who always consider it genteel to be vague and indefinite, the sort of people who prefer to call a cat or a dog a domestic animal. They think it is superior, but it is not. It is only silly and confusing. Popular turns of speech always interest me, writes a correspondent. I like the confiden- tial remark, Say nothink to nobody," and the waiter's response to the customer who thought the beef too much cooked, Sorry, sir, but we ain't got none what's no under- doner." This, overheard the other day, seems even more emphatic. A man was about to show his house to a visitor, and he proudly remarked: "I don't make no doubt 6ut what you won't be surprised when you see what accommodation there isn't inside if" I now send myself to sleep at night, pondering over the real, or, rather, the grammatical, signific- ance of the sentence. Of course, I think I know what the man really thought he was saying. So it would seem that there is, after all, nothing new in the Black Prince's diary un- earthed, remarks the Globe, by an enterpris- ing contemporary. The most 'interesting de- tails are to be discovered in Memorials of the Most Noble Order of the Garter," by Mr. G. F. Beltz, which was published in 1841, and the author, who was Lancaster Herald, evidently had access to the manuscript, which he examined with great care. That is, how- ever, no reason why the diary itself should not be acquired for the nation. A lady who took a cottage at Cookham has named it Oidontno." Curious villagers are always asking who the tenant is, and the reply is usually, Oh, I don't know The next door neighbour has labelled his cot- tage "Ido." A recent anecdote with which Mr. Will Crooks regaled the House told how he met one of his constituents who asked' for the loan of fourpence to buy a loaf of bread. He had already purchased a pound of steak and desired to complete the meal. But," said Will, severely, you've been drinking." Right fust time. guv'nor." answered the man. I've just touched the first two bob I've earned in three days, and I- sim'ly 'ad ter celebrate it. Couldn't "old meself in." And," adds Mr. Crooks, I really couldn't blame 'im." I am told, the Carpenter in the Express says, that London has never before harboured so many skilled exponents of the confidence trick in all its guises than at the present time. At one time the expert tellers of the tale were nearly all English, and they found their vic- tims among Colonials and Americans, who were too confident of their own cuteness. Their success and the great profits of the game have attracted foreign "crooks," who operate among their countrymen who are visiting London. Italians, Germans, and Frenchmen have proved to be just as gul- lible as Americans and Australians. An Englishman and an Irishman working to- gether in partnership under various aliases still hold the record as the most consistently successful tricksters in London, and despite all the efforts of the police they have been making incomes believed to run into several thousands of pounds: A remarkable campaign is being waged by the Great Western Railway with the object of diminishing accidents to employees. Risks are run daily by railwaymen either because familiarity breeds contempt, or because the employees do not always grasp that there is al safe and a dangerous way of carrying out very many operations, whether in the shunt- ing yard, on the track, or in the engineering works. In the company's magazine the right way and the wrong way are explained month by month, the articles being illustrated with comparative photographs. Here is one example of the value of such a safety campaign. A well-known consulting engineer was recently motoring, when he came to a level crossing. A locomotive, which he could not see owing to an interven- ing building, was approaching, and death or injury would have been the result if the driver had not pulled up his car through force of habit. He had accustomed himself to stop when the road was obscured? because, being an old pupil of the Great Western locomotive shops, he had become a reader of the company's magazine, and had thus been led to adopt the Is-it-safe? habit. There has been of recent years, says a writer in the ])a Itil Chi-ori;Ie, a revival of tlie old Ascension Dav custom of beating the bounds." Writing in 1G52 George H r be, Y-t asserts that this practice is particularly dear to the heart of the country parson. fcecuv.re there are contained therein four manifest ad- vantages: (1) A blessing of God for the fruits of the field; (2^ Justice in the preserva- tion of' bounds; (3) Charitie in loving, wa'k- ing. and neighbourly accompanying one another, with reconciling of differences at that time, if there be anv; (4) Mercie in rplieving the poor bv a liberal distribution and largess. whic1. at that time is or ought to be uc.cd. W! lerefore he exacts all to be present at the Perambulation, and those that withdraw and sever themselves from it he misses, and reproves as uncharitable and unneighbourly."

DYMOCK. I

CRICKET FIXTURES. I

Ledbury Produce Market. I

Ledbury Com Market.