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--I CYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLE…

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Farmers and Poiltios. I

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.PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.

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PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE. By RALPH R ALLEN. Lecturer to the Herts County Council; Editor of Monthly Hints on Poultry, &c. (All rights reserved.) A SUCCESSFUL BREEDING SEASON. (CONTINUED.) [Readers are particularly requested to note that this series of articles commenced with the first issue in January. In order to obtain their full value, the earlier articles should be read in conjunction with the current one.] REGULATION BEFORE COMMENCING INCUBATION. It is most important to ascertain that your machine is properly regulated and PERFECTLY STEADY before placing your eggs in the egg- chamber or drawer. Every machine has its own specific instructions for regulation; these should. be closely followed, and it is an error on the right side to allow the machine to run at the required temperature, empty, for three or even four days, rather than? fill it with eggs immediately it reaches its heat. Mention may her& be made that in the case of a new machine, or the first time an incubator is used during the semork, it is really essential to run it empty for a few days. It requires thoroughly warming damp to a greater or lesser extent has got into the machine, and it is advantageous to dry it out in order to secure even runimimg. CARE, OF THE LAMP. Readers must almost be weared by my continue! insistence on the necessity of attention to detail, yet without it saecess cannot be expected. The lamp must receive attention daily. I grant you many will burn for forty-eight hours or even more, but my advice is, see to it daily-it will not then be forgotten-and, further, have a regular time for attending to it. Personally, saine are always trimmed in the morning. If they are done at nighty to my mind there is a danger of them increas- ing their fliante, and, owing to the operator having retired, this might escape attention; the danger, however, is remote. Trimming a lamp is quite a acienee the first particular to remember is scrupulous cleanliness. Never over-fill the lamp reservoir, never cut the wick, rather pinch it off, removing every particle of burnt material. Employ only a high-grade American oil cheap oils are disastrous and even constitute a distinct danger Use a new wick for every hatch, rernerabering it is advantageous to purchase special wicks rather than the common material frequently sold by Italian warehousemen. In good machines the consumption of oil is very small-this is more noticeable still in hot-air machines-this implies that a small Same only is necessary. So after attending to the lamp, see that it is burning brightly and clearly, and just sufficient to keep up the required temperature. Carelessness in this direction, employ- ment of inferior grade oil, neglect in trim- ming and draught are the principal causes of chimneys smoking; a smokey chimney means an accumulation of soot, and, in turn, the presence of soot implies the inability to keep up the required temperature. If the trouble should happen by any cause, I can- not too strongly atvise you to cease opera- tions until such time as the soot is entirely removed. The presence of soot is also a menace to safety, sooner or later it will ifre, and such a danger, perhaps in the middle of the night, is a serious one. The obnoxious effluvia from a smokx chimney ,or a dirty lamp is only of secondary importance, none the less it frequently appeals to one before the more serious reasons here detailed. A final word on this subject; the attention the lamp receives should be such that the incu- bator could remain throughout the hatch in your living, or even bedroom, without caus- ing annoyance. SELF-FILLING LAMPS. I have used these, and willingly concede that great improvements have been made in them during recent years; at the same time I greatly prefer to use the ordinary lamp. A self-filling lamp may act perfectly for years, but sooner or later it will fail, and that failure probably involves the loss of the hatch. Yes, there is also the attendant risk in an ordinary lamp, but inasmuch as that receives attention every twenty-fours hours, against twenty-one days on the other hand, that risk is greatly minimised. Naturally, opinions differ on this point, and should you determine to use a self-filling lamp, be care- full to buy a good one, and from a reputable firm. (To be continued.) [Any enquiries concerning poultry- keeping addressed to our expert, Ralph R Allen, Sawbridgeworth, Herts., will be answered through these columns free, but those requiring a postal answer direct or sending birds for post-mortem examination must remit a half-crown postal order.]

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IACROSS THE TABLE. I

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REVIEWS. I

DYMOCK. I

INEWENT.

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SOOTH WORCESTERSHIRE. [

Ledbury Produoa Market.I

1,Ledbury Corn Market. I