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CYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLE NOTES.

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IPROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.

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HEREFORD HORSE SALES.

MALVERN RESIDENT'S GRATITUDE.I

The Worcestershire Beacon.…

Hereford -Cathedral.--- -…

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LEDBURY RURAL PARISH COUNCIL.…

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PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND1…

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PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND 1 AROUND LEDBURY. Dog HHL A lofty eminence just above the Church, and overlooking the town, giving a clear view of the Marcle Hills, and a panoramic view of the country this side the hills. There are three jubilee seats placed on the top The place car be approached from Church-street or through the ci irehyard. Bradlow Knoll. About 1 mile from the town, and a pleasant walk to the summit. Extensive views can be obtained when the atmosphere is bright. Gloucester Cathe- dral tower is plainly seen with the naked eye, and also the white cliffs above Cheltenham. In the west may be seen the Black Mountains, and May Hill in the Forest of Dean, to the south-west. Eastnor Castle. I A little over two miles from Ledbury. The Castle is a fine baronial mansion, with massive towers, and is partly surrounded by a fine sheet of water. Inside the Castle are fine works of art, by the best masters, some beautiful specimens of tapestry, and an inter- esting collection of armour. Bronsil Castle. From Ledbury 21 miles. Once the residence of Lord Beauchamp, Lord Treasurer to Henry VI. Encompissed with a deep moat, overhung with ancient yew trees, supposed to be four centuries old. It is now in ruins. The Raggedstone Hill. i am nils for the curse, which, accordmg to an old legend, rails on all who come beneath its shadow. The curse is the legacy of a monk of the ancient Priory ■ >f Little Malvern, whose penance consisted of the daiiv ascent of the hill on all fours." I The Obelisk. I On the Malvern Range, overlooking Bronsil I Castle. It is 90 feet high and was erected in I memory of Lord Chancellor Somers and various members of the Somers family. I The Jubilee Drive. A beautiful drive along the west side of the Hills, from the Wyche to the British Camp. Most magnifi- cent views are obtained from it. Cyclists will find it one of the finest drives in the neighbourhood, the gradient being easy and the road bed well kept. The Herefordshire Beacon, or British Camp 1,09b feet high. Four miles from Ledbury. Some very magnificent views may be obtained from the summit of this eminence. Beyond the Beacon are the Midsummer and Hollybush Hills, whose sum- mits are also crowned by another ancient fortress and camp. The Camp forms one of the most inter- esting and attractive objects in the district. The summit of the hill is crowned by one of the most ancient hill fortresses or camps in the kingdom The trenches vary from six to twelve feet deep, and in some places 30 feet wide, and are capable of COll- taining an army of 20,000 men. The citadel is about 50 yards in diameter, and consists of a thirk stone wall, covered with moss, earth and turf, ô!d defended by a deep ditch. This almost impreg- nable fortress is 1,100 yards in length, and 2,970 i u circumference, and covers an area of 44 acres. In addition to its historic interest a magnificent panor- amic view is obtained from its crest. Wellington Heath. Ibis lovely hamlet lies about 1; miles north-west of Ledbury. It is somewhat of a miniature Mal- vern, standing on hilly ground, though it is hid from view from the town of Ledbury by the Frith Wood, behind which it is sheltered from the north. The houses are dotted here and there between the two hills. The road leading to the Heath is rather hilly in parts, and its undulating formation gives it a romantic touch. Hope End, once the residence of Elizabeth Barrett- Browning, the poetess, is close to the village, but the building afterwards gave way to a modern mansion, built by the late Mr C A Hewitt, who was unfortunately compelled to leave the place owing to it being gutted by fire. From the top of the Heath some lovely landscapes are obtained.

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