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AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES. I BY A PRACTICAL FARMER. I THE SUFFOLK HORSE. Thanks to the ability and enterprise of a few breeders, this breed, from being a purely local one, has won fame in many parts of the world for its particular qualities, and it is not surprising to learn that the Suffolk Horse Society is able to report very satisfactory pro- gress during the past year. Entries for Volume 19 of the Stud Book consisted of 246 horses and 690 mares, mak- ing a total of 936, compared with 991 in Volume 18. the largest since the foundation of the society. Whilst the entries of horses decreased, the number of mares entered greatly increased. The Council claims that this state of things denotes that a larger num- ber of Suffolk mares are being bred, and that breeders realise it is advisable to retain only the best of the colt foals for stud pur- poses. The demand for Suffolks from abroad has been most satisfactory, but it is regretted that the larger proportion of the animate ex- ported consisted of mares. Ninety-one animals were exported, against 82 in the previous year, and the countries to which they were sent were Canada, South Africa, the United States, South America, Belgium. Austria, Russia, Denmark, and Australia. The in- crease in the membership of the society, which has been going ahead for several years, istill continues, the total now being 309, against 290. It has been decided by the Council to allo- cate a portion of the receipts received in re- spect of export certificates for the purpose of advertising the Suffolk horse in the Colo- nies and in other parts of the world. Lord Stradbroke has promised to present a chal- lenge cup, to be competed for in Canada, and this is expected to prove a further in- ducement for Canadian importers to make a trial of Suffolk horses. A letter from Mr. Archie Jaques, the lion. secretary of the Suf- folk Horse Society in Canada, states that his Suffolks have given him and others every eatisf action. I I NEW BREEDS OF WHEAT. I am asked by a reader for some brief par- ticulars of the work carried on by Professor Biffen at Cambridge in connection with his wheat-breeding investigations. At the start, samples of wheat were col- lected from every part of the world and sown on small plots. From the first year's crop single ears were picked out and grown on again. Thus several hundred pure strains were obtained. Many were obviously worth- less. A few possessed one or more valuable characteristics: strong grain, freedom from rust, sturdy straw, and so on. These were used as parents for crossing, and from the progeny two new varieties had been grown on, thoroughly tested, and finally put on the market. Both have succeeded, but it is not denied that both have their limitations. Burgoyne's Fife. was distributed by the Millers' Associa- tion. after a series of about forty tests, in which it gave an average crop of forty bushels per acre of grain, which milled and baked practically as well as the best imported Cana- dian wheat. It has repeatedly been awarded prizes for the best sample of wheat at shows, but it only succeeds in certain districts. The other variety. Little Joss, has suc- ceeded much more generally. In a series of twenty-nine trials, scattered between Norfolk and Shropshire. Kent and Scotland, it gave an average of forty-four btis-bels per acre, as compared with forty bushels given by adjoin- ing plots of Square Head's Master. No extra- vagant claims have ever been made for either variety, and as the investigations are only, as it were, in their infancy, we may hope for still more brilliant results in the future. I PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL I CO-OPERATION. In connection with remarks on the progress of agricultural co-operation in other countries as compared with what has taken place in Britain, the secretary of the Agricultural Organisation Society writes to draw attention to some very remarkable facts. As he says. co-operation in Italy, Denmark, Germany, France, and other oountries has had a much longer history thaa the movement has had in our own country. The rate of progress has always been slow at the commencement. In 1901 there were some twenty-five socie- ties existing in England. These increased in 1907 to 170, an increase in the first six yeara flf 145 societies. In 1913 the number of affili- ated societies reached 530, an increase of 385 societies in the second six years. If we com- pare these figures with similar figures of other countries, we find that England com- pares very favourably, and that co-operation advanced through its initial period as rapidly,, more rapidly in most cases, as in other countries. It is only natural that countries such as Denmark, Norway, &c., whose very existence depended upon the revival of their agriculture, should feel the need of more economical methods first, and should also be the first to act. Yet, although these countries have un- doubtedly been in advance of this country as far as agricultural co-operation is concerned, Britain has' not altogether been lagging, for ehe has been the pioneer of industrial co- operation, which can truly be described as one of the biggest movements of modern days. » SALT FOR MANGOLDS. I In common with garden beet and sugar- beet, the mangold is derived from a wild plant which grows on the sea coast. It is thus a salt-loving plant, and it has long been known to benefit by a dressing of common salt. Experiments in the manuring of man- golds conducted at the Harper Adams Col- lege indicated that from 5cwt. to lOcwt. per acre appeared to be the most suitable quan- tities to age. These results attracted considerable atten- tion in t-he district, but many farmers found that a heavy dressing of salt just before sow- ing was attended with considerable damage to the seed. As a result of inquiries regarding this point, a new series of trials has been started, with the object of discovering the best time to apply salt. Six methods were tested, and the best results were obtained by the application of lOcwt. after sowing the seed, this giving a crop of 36 tons per acre, and 5cwt., half of which was applied after sowing the seed and half later as a top dressing, the crop being 35 tons per acre. When applied after splitting the ridges and before sowing the seed, lOcwt. per acre gave a crop of 821 tons, and 5cwt. a crop of 34 tons. Worked in before ridging, 5cwt. gave a crop of 34 tons, and the crop was the same when a similar quantity was applied after splitting the ridges, but where applied after the seed was I sown the yield was 321 4 tons. I The results are not very definitely favour- able to any of the methods, and the experi- ment will be repeated. The previous trials on the general principle are. however, amply confirmed, for the plot with no salt gave a crop of 261 tons per acre, almost 10 tons less than the most successful plot and 6 tons leBS than on any plot dressed with salt. < THE SWINE FEVER REGULATIONS. I The strong feeling in the country against I the measures adopted by the Board of Agri- I culture in their effort to suonress swine fever found expression at the last meeting of tJie Chambers of Agriculture. The Cattle Dis- eases Committee referred in their report to this difficult question, and hoped the Depart- mental Committee would publish further' par- ticulars as to experiments. Colonel Le Roy Lewis said the position was a very serious one. In the last five or six years nearly £5:X),üOO had been spent, and the net result was that swine fever had increased enor- mously. The administrative action taken to stamp out the disease had been a complete and a bsolute faihre. There seemed, -there- fore, he said, to he no particular reason why these vexatious restrictions should still be im- posed on the agricultural community. On the other hand, Mr. Courthope, M.P., chairman of the Departmental Committee, thought the Chamber would be very rash t,) propose the removal of ;t!l restrictions, and it was with a view to finding some means of dealing effectively with the disease that ex neriments were being carried out.

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