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[ALL RIGHTS R SS SSVEI)]. For Love and Honour By HAROLD BINDLOSS, Author of A Wide Dominion," His Adversary's Daughter," The Kingdom of Courage," "The Mistress of Bonaventure," &c. tuw.cz. iViaa jacK, tney called him, ana they weren't far wrong; but there's a good many besides me who'd be sorry when they heard he was drowned." Ah' said Harry, that's something to -say of anybody, isn't it? But did you meet a. man called Salter in the Elliot boats?" His companion's face hardened. Oh, yes, I met him. That's why I left the Calabria before she went down. Only had the one run with Salter on board; but one of us would have been Sorry if I'd stopped. You can take abuse or a hammering when you've earned it, and have nothing against the man; but a wipe in the face with a spanner when it's somebody lse's fault is a different thing. Next time I meet Mr. Salter—ashore—I'll put my mark on him." Do you know he's suspected of man- slaughter? I didn't; but I expected he'd do it some day. Have the police got him?" kind you "Not yet. Now. I know your kind you <Ion't hold your job long—and knocking about -different ports and in different boats, as you -do, it strikes me you have as good a chance of hearing of Salter as anybody. Well, if you can let me know where he is, it might be worth five pounds." "Friend of his?" No, said Harry, drily; I can't say I am. n Mean to put the police on to him ? On the whole, I don't think that's likely." The man looked thoughtful. I might have drawed the line at the police. Had some trouble with them fellows myself, once or twice. Got a nasty bash last time. What address. Harry scribbled Grayson's private address on the back of an envelope, which he handed him. That's London. A long way from here. esid the man, who stopped and gazed at him. There's something about you I ought to know, and I've heard somelxxlv talk like you he fore." Then a. light seemed to break m on him. I've got it now." "Yes," said Harry, simply. "I'm Captain Elliot's son." "Then, five pounds or no five pounds, if 1 liear of Salter I'll put you on; and if I can raise the railway farei I'll come along and finish up when you have done with him." "I believe he's a hard case. You would probably meet your match," Harry answered, smiling. Now you know who I am. you had better write to me-Golden tleece, Dalehead —if you have any news of Salter." They said nothing more of any moment until they reached the village, where Harry ordered a meal for two at an inn. He was quite aware that the landlady would wonder where he had picked up his poverty-stricken companion; but this was not a. matter of any consequence to him. He was, however, not altogether pleased when he saw Alison walk- ing down the quiet street. The window of the sunny, low-ceilinged room was*open, and passing close by she glanced in and recog- nised him after which he saw her eyes rest -with a slightly astonished expression upon the fireman. The latter looked up at Harry with a grin. "Friend of yours?" he aeked. "If I'd known, I'd have got behind that sofa." It would have been a most unwise pro ceeding," said Harry, drily. Pitch into the ham. There's plenty more. He rose in another minute or two, because he fancied Alison meant to call at the little general shop, and he wished to walk home with her. On passing through the bar, he saw the engineer from the miue sitting among two or three others. "How did you come to be here? Have you stopped the pump? he inquired. Had a smash some days ago," the man answered. They've wired to Leeds for some .forgings to come by express, and I'm waiting for Fisher to drive me to the station to ask about them." Harry failed to find Alison in the store, and he had turned back towards the inn when he saw the engineer get into a trap in front of it. He was speaking loudly to one of the men -witii whom he had been sitting; but as soon as he was seated the driver started the horse, which seemed fresh, and the vehicle clattered out of sight round a sharp corner. It had scarcely disappeared when the fireman sprang hurriedly out of the door, and then, swinging round, gazed at the man who still stood out- round Ne locked puzzled and annoyed. "Whose is the trap?" he asked. Belongs to man who keeps the pub. He's gone to the station," was the answer. The fireman turned back into the inn, and 'While Harry followed him entered the bar, which he carefully glanced round. Then he went through into a smaller room behind it, and appeared astonished to find nobody there. Why are you wandering about the place? Harry inquired. "I heard a voice," replied the other. I daresay," said Harry. I heard several." The man knitted his brows. I thought I knew it." It's hardly likely. You have no friends round here ? Nobody nearer than Whitehaven." "Then you must have imagined the thing; and I'll get off," said Harry, who was anxious to overtake Alison. I've spoken to the land- lady, and you ca.n stay the night here." Thank you, sir," replied the man. "You're like your father, and I don't know that I could say any more of you." Though it was a pity he did not wait to in- vestigate the matter, which might have saved him some trouble, Harry turned away; and looking back at the end of the village he saw the fireman gazing up and down the street, as if in search of somebody. CHAPTER XIII. I A fine night had followed severai days of fceavy rain, and Harry sat in the morninj sunshine on the parapet of a bridge some thirty miles from Ruleholnie with his arm round the waist of a little fair-haired girl. It was for the amusement of the latter he was dropping bits of stick into the flood that surged frothing between the limestone piers. Minnie and Tom Grayson, who hud arrived from London for a week or two's holiday on the previous evening, leant against the low wall qlose by with another child. The roofs of a quaint old village frequented by summer visitors peeped out among the birchos a milo lower down the valley. Minnie glanced at the head of the neigh- bouring lake, which gleamed, a streak of silver, between walls of dusky firs; and then at the sweep of hillside that ran up hish aloft and was lost in a gauzy curtain of sunlit mist. It's a lovely spot, and the air's so clean and sweet," she said. I wish we could stay a month here-it would set the children up, and Harry's ,been delicate ever since last winter; but, of course, the thing's out* of the question. A fortnight will be a big enough strain on our finances." If that's the chief difficulty, I think it could be got over." Harry replied. "Tom's about the oldest friend I have, and I've an idea that I ought to show my appreciation of the fact that you called this youngster after nie." Absurd! said Minnie, firmly. You know why we gave him your name. It wasn't in the expectation of favours to come." She coloured slightly, and Harry, who saw that she was determined, smiled at the child. What are you going to do when you grow it,p, my lad ? Go to foreign places—the same as you did," the boy answered, sturdily. Then I'll find diamonds or something, and send Yrainmy money, so she shan't have to work. She shall have a house with a garden—a real one, big enough to grow things iu- and a maid as well as Mrs. Begg." Who's Mrs. Begg?" Harry asked. :dly. The little girl at his side gave him the in- forma.tion. I suppose you couldn't know." alic- said. She lives in Ashpurn-street, and comes in to do the washing once a fortnight. We can't have her oftener." Her mother managed to stop her with a 'warning sign, and Harry, who did not notice this, flashed a quick glance at his friends-. It struck him that Minnie looked jaded, and the children pale. He felt sorry for them. "When Tom wrote that he was coming north, my first idea was that you should stay fith me. be said. I took all the room tliev naa to spare at me inn Tor tne RV.myaer. ar.e. it's an even prettier place than thip. in only trouble was that it's rather too Ruleholme, and I fancied it might be better that my eminent relative shouldn't be im- pressed with the fact that I was on friendly terms with Tom. After all. however, I'm not sure that this would matter very much, and the gentleman in question mightn't even hear that you had stayed with me." He looked at .Grayson. Could you get another week by anv means? No," was the answer. "It's impossible —and, for the reason jou mentioned, it wouldn't be wise." Minnie's face hardened. "Watson goes off almost when he likes," she broke out. He s been away twice this year; but they made it a special favour at the office when Tom got one extra day at Whitsuntide." Then she harked back to her old grievance. Watson used to come round to our house in the evenings be- fore he got on, and nobody need tell me that he's more capable than Tom. I've always had an idea he got pushed on because he wasn't as particular as Tom would have been." "There's no use harping upon it, Minnie." her husband interposed. "He got advanced and I didn't, and that's the end of it. After all. we might be worse off." Harry chatted with the children for a few minutes, and then turned to the man thought- fully. Tom," he said, I've often fancied that my father had a little money; I know my mother brought him some. There's no doubt that he was rather extravagant; but some years ago captains of tramp steamers who went to out-of-the-way places now and then made something by odd favours to merchants and shippers, and I can remember him mention- ing something of the kind. I didn't see him for several years before he was lost in the Calabria, and my mother died when I was voung; but from odd words both let fall I somehow gathered that lie had put some little money into Arnold's vessels. Did you ever hear anything about it 1" "Have vou asked Mr. Elliot?" "I have not. It struck me that if there was anything in the notion, he would have in- formed" me. As he didn't, and I'd nothing but a vague fancy to go upon, I couldn't very well open the matter." Grayson seemed to consider. Well," lie said. I must confess that some years ago I was under much the same impression. I can't tell you why now, but I thought your father had an interest of some kind. On the other hand, when we changed into a limited company his name didn't figure among the shareholders." He broke off and spoke to one of the children before he turned to Harry again in a way which suggested that he found the subject difficult. I can only say this. Like the rest in the office, I've only access to the general accounts—and company balance-sheets aren't always as lucid as they seem—but it's my opinion that the Elliot concern was once or twice in rather a tight place during the past six years." Minnie looked at her husband sharply. Tom," she said. "you don't think-" I'm not in a position to think anything," Grayson replied. It strikes me that Harry had better adopt the same attitude." They passed the next half-hour lounging about the bridge; and then Minnie clutched the little girl, who was straying across the road, as the throbbing of a motor rose from among the birches that filled the valley. Soon afterwards a big car broke out from their shadow, but it stopped a little short of the bridge, where a stream of water that came flashing down a rocky slope fell into it mossy trough. The chauffeur sprang out, and Alison and Arnold Elliot alighted after him, though a figure wrapped in furs sat still he- hind ths screen. Harry touched Grayson's arm. I'd sooner this hadn't happened, but we must face the situation," he said, quietly. Arnold, who strolled towards the bridge with Alison, saw the party next moment, and Harry noticed a quick look of surprise and. he almost fancied, suspicion in his race. but he came on anil bowed to Mumie. I believe you are going to have fine weather after all, Mrs. Grayson, and you have chosen a charming place to stay at." he remarked. "Are these your children?" Minnie said they were, and Elliot turned to Alison. Mr. Grayson is one of my staff." he said. "I think you saw him one day at the office." Alison bowed to Grayson, and Elliot went on: "The circulating water got overheated coming up the long hill. and my chauffeur wants to fill up." he explained to the rest. Will you come along and look at the car? I daresay we could take the youngsters as far as the village." They walked back together, and when they stopped beside the handsome car Elliot turned to Grayson. I was a little surprised to see Harry with you. until I remembered that you began your busi ness life together in my office." he said. Harry, wh o was speaking to Maud Elliot, looked up with a laugh. We were good friends in those days. He wrote me that he was coming here, and I ran down to talk over old times with him." "Then he knew you were at the Golden Fleece?" Arnold a^ked. with a quickness which did not escape Harry's attention. "Of course I ran across him one day in the Temple Gardens and gave him my address." Elliot smiled goodhumouredly. "You once very nearly got Grayson into serious trouble; antVI must confess that you now and then occasioned me some uneasiness, besidos giving Watson cause for complaint." Harry did not resent this. To some extent it was true, and though he was conscious that Alison was watching him, it failed to strike him that Elliot had spoken for her and his daughter's benefit. This. however, occurred to Minnie, and a faint sparkle which her husband knew the meaning of, crept into her eyes. I won't believe anything very bad of Harry. Maud broke in. Thank you," said Harry. I'm sorry I can't be certain your confidence is alto- gether justified." It's curious how you harum-scarum young men find women willing to defend you," Arnold remarked. "If v.,e staid and ol)er people ventured half as far, we certainly shouldn't meet with the same 'consideration." Minnie noticed Alison's face, and un- derstood. Elliot had indulged in this badinage to corroborate stories of the younger man which he had either set on foot or countenanced. I'm a champion of Mr. Harry Elliot's." she broke in, looking at Alison. lie was thoughtless in his early days, but I'm sure h" never did anything then or afterwards that he could seriously regret." Maud glanced at her with a somewhat curi- ous smile, and Elliot made a deprec atory gesture. He's fortunate, he said. pleasantly. "After all, Mrs. Gray-tin only bearo out jvhat I was saying." He turned to her. No doubt you saw a good deal of Harry?" "Of course!" said Minnie. "When he was in London." Elliot's face was expressionless, but site fancied that she had made a mistake. Well," he said, we must be getting on, as we must reach Leeds to-night, and if you'll trust us with the children, we'll promise to set them down safely at the village." They were eager to go, and when the car went throbbing down the road, Grayson looked at his wife. My dear," he said, I'm not sure you were altogether wise in speaking in that way to my employer." I wasn't speaking to—him—but he seemed good-humoured," Minnie replied. Besides, I had my reasons." The trouble is that one can very seldom tell whether Elliot's good-humoured about things or not," Grayson pointed out. They strolled on down the road, and by- and-bye Minnie spoke again. I suppose the tall one is Mr. Elliot's niece?" she said. She struck me as a young woman who likes her own way, and rather proud, but she has a fine face. She looks staunch, nnd I think she'd stick to a thing once she felt it was right, though she would need convincing be- fore she got an idea she didn't like into her head. In a way, she's handsome." There can be no doubt on that point," U_v <110,1 _1 ieii, sa.,cl Minnie. i was sorry tor the other; a helpless invalid Tom says. I like her face even belter. h'g so gentle and patient. It's curious a man like tllat should have such a girl for a daughter and another for a niece." You seem to have a profound distrust of him," Harry commented. I wouldn't trust Elliot with sixpence if I could help it. I've never believed in him since he moved up Watson over my husband's head, though I don't know if that's logical." I daresay it's natural," Harry answered, with a smile. They met the children coming back further on, and the little girl clutched a decorated cardboard box, while her bm:'i"r's was full. "Harrys as 'hL, can. and he'll want mine after v. a:- N." she be- gan. "The lady who didn't get on; me them." Then she looked at her father. You never bring me sweets Jike tlwse," No," said Grayson, drily; "I'm afraid you'll have to be content, with common ones. You see, I'm not a shipowner." Your father earns his money," Minnie re- marked. Don't be too hard on Elliot," Harry ob- jected. "He meant to please the youngsters." I daresay the girls meant to please them," Minnie corrected him. Elliot only wanted to do what would look nice and graceful which is a different thing. The man had an audience and couldn't help acting." They said no more on the subject, but when they were strolling by the lake that evening Minnie smiled at Harry, who walked a little behind the rest with her. You think a good deal of Mr. Elliot' niece?" she said. Harry was slightly astonished; but he answered candidly, "That is true, but the other side of the question is more important— I mean, what she may happen to think of me," Minnie nodded. Well." she said, "she's not in love with you yet, but if I were you 1 wouldn't despair." "What leads you to believe "I watched her face while Elliot was föpeaking about you." "So did I," said Harry. "I didn't notice anything encouraging in it. On the whole, she looked indignant. At the same time I was puzzled as to why Elliot spoke as he did. He's not greatly given to pleasantries of that kind." He had an object," said Minnie, oracularly. Then the little boy demanded to be taken out on the lake, and soon after Henvv f,)t a boat they were driven back by heavy ram. Next. morning it was raining harder than ever, and in a day or two Ilarrv, who arranged for his friends to visit him. wen: back to the dale. On the afternoon following his arrival he was walking home by the river- side when he turned off to the mine, and found Mat and several others clearing out a channel for the water that poured down the hillside. A few more figures were visible through the rain further up the slope. A power of water coming down, said Mat. stopping to lean, upon his .shovel. There is," Harry agreed. How is it yuu haven't cut some drainage trenches before? It rains pretty often in this country." Mat pointed to a. cascade which splashed down the face of a neighbouring crag ir. threads of foam. Beck cgmes out of the Flow—the wet moss beneath the Pike," he explained. Used to fall down the crag, but Flow's been creeping lately, and part of the water runs round this way behind the Knowe." A patch of wet bog will sometimes spread across its usual boundaries, and Harry could understand that the stream would be diverted by this means into a new channel, which, as it happened, had its outlet near the mine. You'll have trouble to keep it out of the workings if the rain goes on," he suggested. We've trouble now," Mat replied. II Mine's wet, any way, and pump was stopped some days. Engine man got new things he wanted, but some wadn't fit right, and he cannot give pump more than lmlf steam. That's wha.t took Mr. Elliot, to Leeds." He fell to work again, and Harry turned away thoughtfully. Arnold, he fancied, had been hardly hit by the loss of his new steamer, and now it seemed likely that he would be involved in unusual expenses over the mine. (To be continued).

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