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PERPETUATED PERSONALITIES.…

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PERPETUATED PERSONALITIES. A second series of portraits and biogra- phies in the February Windsor Magazine" supplements a previous article, which aroused great interest, under the title of Perpetuated Personalities," being a survey of the diverse reasons for which the name of an individual has survived his lifetime as the name of some object or custom origin- ated by him. The classification of the different reasons for such survivals brings out many curious points of interest, ranging from Plato to Joe Miller and Mrs Bloomer, the American lady who first, in modern t i mes, advocated the substitution of the trouser for the skirt in woman's attire. Writing of the name Macadam" and the man who made it famous, the author says :— The revival of interest in our great high- ways has been a natural consequence of the popularity of the motor-car, aud the relative values of macadam,' tar-macadam,' short- ened to 4 tar-mac,' and other methods of road construction has become one of the vital questions of the hour. Macadam and macadamise' are words used every day with very little thought of their origin. But John Loudoun Macadam was a real benefactor to coaching mankind in days when roads were often veritable Sloughs of Despoad. It is worth notitig, by the way, that the Slough of Despond in the 'Pilgrim's Progress was simply a hopeless piece of road directly in the path of Christian and Pliable, and therefore unavoidable. Bunyan, on his travels, must often have met such a piece of foul going. Too many illustrators i make the Slough a sort of pond or morass off the maiu road, which quite spoils the point. The pilgrims had to go through it willy-nilly -Hobson's choice, in fact. To return to Macadam, he was born at Avr in 1756, the son of a landed proprietor. When be was fourteen he was sent to New York, where he remained for many years. Return- ing at length to Ayrshire, he served as Deputy-Lieutenant of the County, and as Justice of the Peace, which office brought him upon the Board of Road-Trustees and turred his attention to the improvement of highways. "Later he became a victualling agent to the Navy, went to reside at Falmouth, remov- ing thence to Bristol, where he was appointed surveyor to the Bristol roads. There be first put his ideas into practice, and built roads with a bed formed of fragments of stone, no stone to be too large to pass through an iron ring two and a half inches in diameter. He saw his scheme brought into general use, and received a Parliamentary grant of to his expenses. Macadam died. eighty-ono, at Moffat." An interesting programme of fiction by famous jjovelisfs, and important articles by writers (If special authority on their respective themes, is set forth in the February Windsor Magazine," which contains a further large instalment of Sir H Rider Haggard's powerful new romance, from the career of his well-known character, Allan Quartermaic, The Holy Flower," a further episode su Halliwell Slltcliffe's fascinating new series, "The White Horses," and complete stories by Eden Phillpotts, E F Benson, Domford Yates, James Nairne, and Campbell MacCulloch. Prominent among the articles of the number is one of exceptional interest for golfers by Harrv Yardon, under the title of "Hints for the Long-Handicap Golfer." The floe-art feature of the number consists of a survey of the work of that popular Victorian artist, the late Phil Morris, A.R.A., which is accompanied by some eighteen reprod uctions from the artist's work, including his greatly-pcpular picture. "Sons of the Brave," and a finely-printed coloured plate of the best of his religious pictureH) TLe Shepherd of Jerusalem."

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I PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.…

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[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] BIBLE…

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] _ACROSS THE TABLE. I

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NEWENT.

DANGER IN THE WEATHER.

Lsdbury Produce Market.

Ledbury Corn Market.

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I _____BISHOPS FROOME.

HOW I RUBBED AWAY A STONE…

[No title]

I LOTS MORE LIKE IT.

I MUCH MARCLE.