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THE PICTURE PALACE. I

iORIGINAL ,POETRY. I

BOSBURY. I

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DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MRS SIDNEY…

ROYAL AGRICULTURAL BENEVOLENT…

REDMARLEY. 1

.IMUCH MARCLE. j

COLWALL NE Ws-

BISHOPS FROOME.I

DYMOCK.

NEWENT.

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Family Notices

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I LEDBURY POLICE. I

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I LEDBURY POLICE. I I WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28. I I Before Alderman John Riley (in the chair), Mr I Spencer H Bickham, Mr J Wilfred Hewitt, Dr M A Wood, and Mr Fred Ballard. I TRANSFER. I I The Itcenae oi the Oak Inn, Munsley, was I permanently tranferred from Richard Spencer I deceased, to Andrew R Bengry. I EXTENSION. I Mr M J Powell, Horse and Groom Hotel, Colwall, was granted an extension of one hour on February 5, on the occasion of the annual dinner of the "Loyal Perseverance" 1_ Lodge of Oddfellows. _n I I ALLEGED ASSAULT AT MATtlU. I James Soley, labourer, Mathon, was charged with assaulting Annie Merrrick, married woman, also of Mathon, on January 5. The case was down for hearing at the last Court, but neither of the parties appeared, and a letter was read from the complainant withdrawing the summons, but the Bench decided that the parties must appear before them. Complainant gave details of the assault and said defendant struck her twice in the mouth. There bad been some unpleasant- ness. John Merrick, husband of the complainant, said he and Solely had had words. He saw Soley strike his wife twice, cutting her mouth and making it bleed. In reply to the Bench, the witness said the people over whom the bother was about had left the parish, and be did not wish to give evidence against the man, as they worked together and had a good deal to put up with. Mr Hewitt: But if you work together that does not entitle him to bit your wife in the mouth. Defendant said be did not hit Mrs Merrick. Her husband knocked him down, and hit his own wife. Sergt Howard said it was a drunken squabble. The bother was over a girl, and Merrick was as bad as Soley. The Bench inflicted a fine of 10s and costs, J:9sin all. A fornight was allowed for payment. I CRUELTY TO A HORSE. I Robert Pickersgill, of Hereford, was sum- moned for working a horse while the animal was in an unfit state at larrington on January 14 last. P.C. Matthews, of Tarrington, said about 2 p.m. he was cycling from Ledbury to Tarrington, and when at the Bush Pitch be saw defendant in charge of three horses and a timber carriage. He noticed the middle horse, a white one, was sweating profusely, ,was tucked up, and was lame on the two fore feet, the near one especially. He spoke to defendant, who said be came from Defford that morning and was going to Hereford, and the horse bad only just dropped lame. He told defendant that in ibis opinion the horse was not fit to travel and advised him to put it up and fetch it later. At 5 p.m. he saw defendant at Tarrington, and the horse was in about much the same condition. He asked defendant if he had tried to put the horse up and he said he bad not done so. He told him he considered the horse unfit to travel, and took possession of it, putting it up at the Foley Arms, Tarrington, and giving information to the Inspector of the N.,S.P.C.A. He was present later when Inspector Lewis and Mr Beeson examined the horse, when it took them ten minutes to get the horse out of the stable. Next morning it was in much the same condition, and later defendant visited the horse and he could not get it out of the stable. There was no load on the timber carriage, but the horse was so harnessed that the front horse was simply pulling it along. Inspector Lewis-said he saw the horse the same night and it,certainly was very lame. He saw defendant next morning at Hereford, w hen be told witness that he was foreman in sole charge of the horses for a Mr Johnson, a timber dealer, of Yorkshire. Defendant told him he came from Thrapston in Northamptonshire on Sunday, and the horse had thus travelled 115 miles. He also said the horse went. all right until the previous day, but witness said he doubted it. Defendant admitted the horse had been off work two months and that he had told his employer a month ago that the horse ought to go on the farm as it was not fit for work on the hard roads. Later he saw defendant and his employer together, when his employer denied that be knew the horse was so lame, and that he should have boxed the horse, as he had done another one. The horse was the lamest he had ever seen, and the wall of the near fore foot had completely fallen in, and it must have suffered agonies. Stephen Beeson, veterinary surgeon, of Hereford, said he examined the horse and it was excessively lame from the disease in the feet. The feet had suffered some time ago from laminitis, and had not got into proper condition. He should say the horse was not fit to start on the morning of January 4, and ought not to have been walked that distance, and it was gross cruelty to compel the horse to do so. Defendant: Do you thiafe the horse was fit to start from Thrapston on Sunday ? Witness He may have been, but the long distance had told on him. Robert Pickersgill, timber haulier, said he left Thapston on Sunday, when the horse was quite sound, also on Monday and Tues- day, and he did not notice anything wrong with him on Wednesday morning. Four miles from Ledbury he noticed the horse was not going so well,but he thought he was tired, as be bad already come 100 miles. He thought if he could get the horse to Here- ford he would be able to look after him better, as he had been lame before, and he had got him all right. By the Bench: He had previousl y boxed one horse, but thought this one would travel through, or he would have boxed this one as well. Mr Hewitt: Didn't it occur to you to take the horse out at Led bury, knowing its past history ? Defendant: I wanted to get it on to Here- ford, where I could have looked after it my- self. The Bench said there was no doubt defendant worked the horse in an unfit state, and it was very cruel. He would be fined ..£3 and -63 4s 3d costs. Defendant paid £ 3 down and and was allowed a fortnight in which to pay the remainder. TESTING RUNABOUTS ON THE I HILLS. t Robert Douglas Oliver, of Malvern Link, was summoned for driving a motor tri-car at an excessive speed along the Jubilee Drive on January 8. Defendant pleaded not guilty. Fred Ballard, of Col wall, said he was on the Jubilee Drive at 12.15 p.m.. on January 9. when he noticed a tri-car going along the drive at & speed Le considered to be about 30 miles an hour. He informed the police, as there had been numerous complaints, and the result was be had a summons to appear there that morning. He could not recognise anyone in Court as the driver. He was the oldest motorist in the county of Hereford, and considered he could judge speed. It was a flat, level piece of road, and there was no other traffic on the road. He took the num- ber of the car later, as it was returning from the hills. There had been two fatal accidents on that road, a boy killed at one end, and a man at the other end. Cross-examined by defendant He could see the car for 300 yards and not 70 yards. Frederick Bourne, of Colwall, said be was in company with the last witness, and saw the tri-car, which he thought was going 30 miles an hour. He judged the speed of the car by other cars he saw go along the road, and this one was going faster than others. He knew defendant as the driver. Defendant went into the box and said he was a test driver for Messrs Morgans, Malvern. On the day named he drove a small tri-car, and he did not drive at any- thing like the pace suggested. He noticed Mr Ballard standing back from the drive, and went and stood in the same place and he could not see above 70 yards. The Morgan runabout was a very low car, and it would be bidden under the side of the hill, so that it would be impossible for him to see the car. The cars were not teated for speed, but to see if the cars would climb hills. They could not get 30 miles out of a car new from the works. By Supt. Williams: The Morgan run- about advertised to do over GO miles per' hour was a machine built specially for racing at Brooklands, and was not the same machine as the one he was driving. The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr C B Masefield): Your catalogue says an 8 h.p. machine will do 45 miles an hour ? Defendant: Yes, but not one straight from the works, with a new engine with stiff bearings. You could not get that speed out of her until she had run 300 or 400 miles. Defendant went on to say that he thought there was a prejudice against them because they tested their cars on the hills. Had he been asked politely not to drive in that direction be would have acceded to the request. He had driven for several years in some of the busiest places in the country and had up to now held a clean license. The Chairman said there seemed to be some doubt about the case. Under those circumstances if defendant would pay the costs 8s, they would not record a conviction. If they were going to test their machines they must be careful ef theii* behaviour on the roads. Defendant paid the 8s and said if it was desired that they should keep off the Jubilee Drive thev would do so. A LENIENT VIEW. Richard Perks, of Much Marcle, was charged with removing pigs from Ledbury Market to Much Marcie without a removal license on January 13. Defendant, a very elderly man, said he was ignorant of the regulations. He bad a small place, but had not bought any pigs in Ledbury Market for ten years. He .did not wih to break the law. Supt. Williams said he had no doubt the offence was committed without thought. Still an offence had been committed. Defendant was warned, and the case was dismissed. A LARGE FAMILY. I Walter Baker, labourer, of Much Marde, was summoned under the Education Bye-laws in respect of six of his children, Edith 13. Ernest 12, Mary 10, James 7, Hubert 6, and Tracey 5. Mrs Baker appeared for her husband, and carried a baby in her arms. H W Hayter, clerk and school attendance officer to the Ledbury Rural District School Attendance Committee, said James, Hubert and Tracey had not attended school at all. Edith had not attended since defendant was fined on July 30 last. Earnest's and Mary's attendances were very bad. Edith, Ernest and Mary were all in Standard I. The distance was 2 3-8 miles. There was a very large family. In reply to the Cnairman, Mrs Baker said she had 14 children alive, of whom three were at work. Fined 28.f3d.

PUTLEY.I

KEMPLEY. I

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