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SPORTS AND PASTIMES.

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I MARKETS. 1 1

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

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! REVIEW OF THE CORN TRADE.

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I WORK AND WORKERS.

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I WORK AND WORKERS. POSTAL SERVANTS' DEMANDS RAILWAY MATTERS — THK "GRIEVANCE HKAKKR — LIABILITY FOR INSURANCE CARDS—CADEBT COLUERY OFFICIALS SUMMONED—BUILDERS AXD TK.W>E UNIONISTS. The Postmaster-General has received a de- putation from the Post Office Controlling Officers' Association, representing the male and female members of the postal, telegraph, and telephone branches. The deputation laid before Mr. Samuel certain anomalies arising out of the Holt Committee's recommenda- tions. The chief points presented were scales of pay, promotion, hours of attendance, and vested interests. It was pointed out that, whereas the rank and file and the higher- grade officials are to receive increases of pay, certain sections of the controlling officers of both sexes have been entirely ignored. It was promised that further consideration would be given to this matter. The National Joint Committee of Postal Trade Unions at Leicester has discussed its plans for the Parliamentary agitation in sup- port, of the movement for an advance of wages. Every member of the House of Com- mons is to receive a statement of the case. At a public meeting one speaker said that if, after all, they failed to get their demands, no responsible Minister would blame them if they took the Jaw into their own hands. At the close of the proceedings on Saturday a statement was issued to the effect that the Joint Committee decided not only to enter on an active Parliamentary campaign, but to ask. for an interview with Mr. Lloyd George on the Holt Report, the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer beiflg the -technical freed -of the Post 'Office. -Alr. J. 'H. Thomas. M. P., addressing a meeting <■>? railwaymen at Cardiff on Sunday said that a policy of sectional or sympathetic strikes would lead to and disaster. It was no use attempting to bluff employers, they had got past the stage of pious resolu- tions. and it was no use talking of s t-ri ke s when they did not mean anything of the- kiiid. A demand for a 30s. minimum wage would lead to endless friction. It would not result in benefit to many, and would split up the men into sections. It is reported that the London and North- western Railway Company have intimated to their police staff that they must not in future belong to a trade union. Notice to this effect has. it is stated, been given to the Liverpool district, and one member of the police staff, who is a member of their National Union of Railwayrnen, has been iiiforrne4 that he must either "leave the union or the police depart- ment. Some indignation has been aroused among railway trade unionists by this phase of industrial trouble, and a prominent railway union official of the Liverpool district stated on Saturday that the matter has been re- ported to Unity House and to the Railway- men's Vigilance Committee. It is stated that the man referred to declares his intention of remaining with the 'National Union of Rail- daymen. Mr. T T. Williams, whose promotion to the post of chief iroods manager to the London and North-Western Railway Company renders vacant the pokt of "grievance bearer' will be succeeded in that capacity by his son. Mr. W. H. Williams. The post wifs created by the company two years ago in order to investigate causes of unrest among the staff, with a view to their removal where possible, and it has been so successful that the experiment is to be continued. The liability of an employer for retaining-a workman's insurance cards was a point raised at Dudley, when a boilernuikcr sued his late emplovers for £ 1 19s. 6d. Plaintiff said he left without notice, and did not con- sider he was compelled to give notice. Tfe Obtained another situation, but when he ap- plied for his health and uueinplovment cards to be sent to him by post the firm refused, unless "he served his notice. He was unable; to retain his new berth in consequence, and was thrown out of work. It was submitted that the cards did not belong to the plaintiff, but to the Insurance Commissioners and the Board of Trade, and that they were lost in :the post. The case was dismissed. The Doneasfcer 'West Rifling magistrates were engaged for over six hours on Saturday înhe(t,ring summonses against three princi- pal officials of the Cadeby colliery, where the great disaster occurred in. July. 1912. for not widening the main -roads, as. required by the Mines Act, 1911. The prosecution was instituted by the Home Office. The defence •was that, in view of the explosion and the • coal srrike. the company had not had suffi- cient time to complete the work. and that: they were proceeding with it as fast a.s they could. In dismissing the case, the Chair- man said the magistrates recognised the 1 difficulty which the company had I to contend with, having regard to the safety of the ,mine,, a.ri,d they did not consider there should ibe a conviction. Mr. S. Stonnett. district secretary of the Amalgamated Society of 'Carpenters and i Joiners, said that the statement., appear;n in the Press that the I on don builders' action in giving notice to five of the prin- eipal trade unions to terminate the acree- ment. was justified was somewhat misl^ad ng, •as It gave the public the impression thnt the various societies had openly violated the agreement. The rules provided, that in case of violation of the agreement a meei'ng of the Conciliation Board should be called, and the only two meetings of the 1J(Jv:rd culled I last, year were in respect of violations of the i' rules bv members of the Masters' Associa- tion. Som-e of the builders had not strictly adhered to the agreement, and if the builders w-e-re. j-ustined c-Aiieell, ig rules over petty disputes which had occurred, the unions would have ben justified in taking the <sa,me course. He was of opinion that if both sides would exercise a little tolerance towards each other at the present moment a better understanding would be brought about. The Ashton-under-Lvne Trades and Labour Council have decided to present a meniorial to the Chancellor of the Ducby asking for the appointment of more magis- trates for the borough. There are now thirty-eight magistrates on the list, against sixty when the last maHristprial appointments were made. The Trades Council have nominated Mr. Tom Cox. miners' agent; Mr. James Edgar, tailors' society; Mr. S. T. Cogsins. weavers' secretaryMr. John E. Hirst, insurance agent; and Mr. J. W. Wel- ford, tramway employees' representative. When the million and a-lialf women who are employed as domestic servants in this country have become members of the Domestic Workers' Union, those ladies of titJwho denounced the Insurance Act so vehemently as an unnecessary interruption of the invariably harmonious and idyllic rela- tions between mistress and maid will be faced with a still more terrible situation, says the Manchester Guardian. For the organisers want the conditions of domestic service put on a more definite basis, and already they seem to have the very clearest ideas on what that ba,s.;s must be. They demand: Twelve-hour dav: set meal hours; provision of uniform; half-holiday weekly; graded scale of wages; fortnightly; two free hours daily; com- pulsory character note; abolition of regis- tries; all public 'holidays; one week's holiday in three months; sanitary bedrooms. It is not stated how many of these con- cessions the Union hopes to secure in the im- mediate future, but an article by Miss Jessie Stephen in the Labour Woman gives an en- thusiastic account of the Union's progress in Glasgow, where over 100 members have re- cently been enrolled. Miss Stephen adds that the demand for sanitary bedrooms is more im- portant than might appear at a first glance, and gives some details of highly insanitary conditions. It is the only comment she makes on the union's demands, and it touches one of the most awkward facts in the problem of the servant—that there are such wide differencee in households and mistresses, and that the good mistress, who looks at the problem from her own experience, has usually no idea of the bad mistress and the treatment she accorda to her servants.

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