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MALVERN HILLS CONSERVATORS.

IMONTHLY AGRICULTURAL REPORT.…

I TWINS CURED OF ECZEMA. I

I -NEWENT.-I

I CYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLE-NOTES.…

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JUST NEAR HOME.I

Ledbury Produoe Market.

IILedbury Corn Market.

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tHEREFORDSHIRE TEACHERS' DEMANDS.

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t HEREFORDSHIRE TEACHERS' DEMANDS. I Will thare Ha a Strike ? The question of teachers' salaries w is dis- j cussed at a meeting of the Herefonishiie j County Council, held at Hereford on Satur- day, under the presidency of Colonel Prescott Decie. The Education Committee reported that during the past quarter considerable atten- tion had been given to the question of salaries, particularly those of head teachers, as it was represented to the Committee that the salaries of Herefordshire teachers were lower than the salaries paid to teachers in other counties. The teachers also asked for a scale of salaries. The Committee had decided by 33 votes to 2 that it was not desirable to establish a scale of salaries. They had also arrived at the conclusion that the salaries of head teachers in some cases were lower than those paid to teachers in most other counties, and they had unanimously decided to increase them to the extent of 11,300, the increase to take effect as from January 1, 1914. This, how- ever, had not had the desired effect, and the teachers stated they would be satisfied with an adequate scale of salaries. To emphasise their determination to have a scale of salaries, 102 head teachers and 31 assistant teachers (after making allowance for 11 withdrawals) had resigned, but in the case of 31 assistant teachers who bad resigned, each was the wife of a master of a school. Without advertising the Committee had received a considerable number of applications for these posts, the majority of which would become vacant on January 31, and the Com- mittee hoped there would not be any serious difficulty in filling the places of all teachers who had resigned. I I "NO HOSTILITIES." I Sir James Rankin, Bart., moved the adop- tion of the report, and said the question of the salaries had given the Committee a good deal of trouble. We regret very much," he added, that the teachers have thought it necessary to strike against us, and that no mutual consideration should be shown. I have no doubt that if that mutual con- sideration bad been sought without a strike, it would have been shown, and the whole question would have been considered in a much more proper and amicable spirit. I hope the teachers will understand there is no hostility in the minds of the Education Committee towards them. We have already shown our willingness to meet a good deal of the teachers' complaints by increasing their salaries by a very considerable amount. We have increased them already by about £ 1,300, because we found that a good many of the low salaries complained of were not quite as much as the salaries paid in other counties. That was to show the teachers, the County Council, and the ratepayers that the Committee is not antagonistic to the teachers at all. I say this on behalf of the Committee as well as my own behalf that we shall be sorry to lose them. (Applause.) There is one point on which they and we differ entirely, and it is in regard to a scale of salaries. The Committee which was specially to go into the whole matter came to the conclusion that they could not grant a scale of salaries, and they were altogether supported by the full Education Committee on that point. I look upon a scale of salaries as certainly not a good thing for the Educa- tion Committee, and not a desirable thing for the teachers. Surely a good teacher should be promoted and should get some encouragement. To make a hard and fast scale, so that the good, bad, and indifferent teachers altogether are paid the same wage, is a very undesirable arrangement. Mr F Ballard (Colwall): No one has suggested such a proposal as that. NO PROSPECT OF A SCALE. I Sir James Rankin I am all for encourag- ing a good teacher, but I am certainly not in favour of encouraging a bad teacher. It is far better that teachers should be paid according to their merits rather than there should be a scale. As far as I know there will not be a scale granted to the teachers. If the teachers are striking for a scale and nothing else, and that scale is not granted to them, we shall have to part with them, and we shall be very reluctant to see them abandon their positions. I hope that will not be the case, and that the teachers will see it is better to fall into line and say to them- selves, Although we have not got a scale we have bad our salaries considerably increased. Proceeding, Sir James hoped they would come to some terms. He thought that to a very great extent the teachers were fairly happy in their present homes, and a great many of them at all events did not want to go although they had been constrained to hand in their resignations. Mr Hopkins (Ledbury) pointed out that the Committee had also decided to bring the teachers' salaries under review annually. Mr Ballard said the education in Worcester- shire was better than in Herefordshire. Miners and doctors were allowed to have a minimum wage, and he wanted to know why schoolmagterr in this county should not have one also. (Laughter.) If they had bad teachers they should have turned them out long ago. He thought the Committee had started on a fight in which they would be heavily beaten. He wished to dissociate himself from the action of the Committee. In his opinion the Board of Education would not be worth their salt if they did not ride over their heads. He hoped they would. Mr Langford (Hereford) said teachers wanted a scale so that they should not have to depend on the reports of the managers for increases in their salary. Those reports might be withheld at the present time for reasons which were not educational, and that was the strong objection. The Education Committee had muddled things badly. Mr E F Bulmer hoped the Committee would negotiate with the Teachers' Union to avoid the disastrous results of a strike. If the schools were closed the education of the children would suffer. Colonel Prescott Decie said the National Union of Teachers had been guilty of gross and habitual misrepresentation but in the end the feeling was that the teachers' official representatives could, if v they wished, approach the Committee, although at the Committee meeting it was stated that negotiations could not be renewed. The report was adopted. There have been 218 resignations and a few withdrawals, and the Committee state that as far as applications for the vacancies are concerned matters are satisfactory, in spite of the fact that the National Union of Teachers have prohibited applications and guaranteed the strikers full pay.

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FOOTBALL NOTES. I

WORCESTER & DISTRICT LEAGUE.

»—— FIXTURES AND REFEREES…

HEREFORDSHIRE JUNIOR LEAGUE.

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FOOTBALL FIXTURES.

HEREFORDSHIRE JUNIOR LEAGUE.

AIR-RIFLE SHOOTING.

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