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HEREFORDSHIRE TEACHERS' i…

I NEWENT. )

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] BIBLE…

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ICANADIAN NEWS JOTTINGS.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. \

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PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.

iA NOTABLE NEW YEAR NUMBER.

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TEACHERS REJECT PROPOSALS…

SIR J. YOXALL, M.P., AND THEI…

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SIR J. YOXALL, M.P., AND THE I QUESTION OF SCALE. There is every evidence that the teachers of Herefordshire are determined upon a strike. For the last nine years they have been agitating for a scale of salaries, but this has been refused, the local education authority preferring to deal with the head masters and teachers upon their individual merits. The Salaries Committee have been revising the salaries so as to make them not less than those paid to teachers holding similar positions in similar counties, and on Saturday last the Education Committee granted increases amounting to over £1,300 per annum. On Monday the teachers refused to accept this as a solution of the trouble. Interviewad on the subject, Sir James Yoxall, M.P., secretary of the National Union of Teachers, said The Education Committee's decision acknowledges two things, although grudginly-first, that the teachers have been most inadequately paid in the past, and, secondly, that the National Union of Teachers is a powerful organisa- tion, whose requests, when they are reason- able, must be entertained. The increases in salaries seemed to be based upon no system. Some of the increases are as low as 11, one as high as £ 40, only two are Y,30, the bulk being X5 or Y,10, while many have no increases at all. No principles that one can discover have been applied to the offers of amended salaries, and length of service does not appear to have been counted. These proposals are unsuitable and the teachers at their meeting on Monday renewed their request for a sale. As to the National Union of Teachers, the local Education Committee evidently do not recognise the kind of body they are dealing with. It has been acknowledged in Parliament over and over again that the union is working chiefly for the benefit of I the school and the child, and also secondarily for the private benefit of the teacher." It j was not an aggressive or selfish body. Every resonable method had been tried, but the Herefordshire Education Committee had shown a lack of comprehension or concession. The union would now stand by its present position. During the year 1912 there was an increase in the membership of the union of 10,000, and the total strength was now about 88,000; while ample funds were forthcoming no matter how long the present dispute lasted. If the Herefordshire teachers left, 1 who would take their places ? There was a dearth of teachers everywhere. It would only be by raising the salaries at the Here- fordshire schools to an almost extravagant extent that the committee would be able to attract teachers from elsewhere, and surely it would be botter to induce the present teachers to stay. Sir James added that if the local education authority desired to know what the union considered to be a suitable scale for teachers  in Herefordshire they would be happy to j furnish the information or if they would I like to meet representatives of the union and local teachers they would attend, provided they were beard together and not separately. He personally was quite ready to do anything reasonable, proper, and fair to the teachers to assist in the direction of a settlement. But," added Sir James, We are firm upon the question of a scale which shall be satisfactory."

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