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Workmen's Examiners. (Continued).…

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Workmen s Examiners. (Continued). BY "SCRANTON." I SOME OBJECTIONS MET. It has been demonstrated conclusively, I think, that the old-fashioned method of selecting colliery workmen's examiners spasmodically, from amongst the workmen at a colliery is effete, and obsolete. That it is wasteful, unfair, inefficient, and crude. It has also been established equally con- clusively, that where you have part-time examiners chosen from amongst the men, to operate for a given period, say for 12 months, you have a better method, and one which will in all probability give better re- sults. But notwithstanding this, the latter system does not fulfil the requirements of the case, insofar as it does not attract the best men. As has been already demon- strated there is one method that eliminates all these disadvantages, and has advantages peculiar to itself; this is the permanent full- time examiners. Sufficient has already been 1 said in reference to the comparisons of the various kinds of examiners, and the pre- ponderance of the evidence has been en- tirely in favour of the last discussed. I have heard of no objection to this, the only objection that I have encountered hitherto is that it is hardly worth while, on account of the imminence of Nationalisa- tion of Mines, or alternatively of the dual- control of the industry. I shall now set out myself to deal with this objection, and as a preliminary will quote a few extracts from various papers bearing upon the subject. RooF-F.%LL VICTIM .—Five men Buried in Pit at Treherbert. The Bute Colliery, Treherbert was on Wednesday the scene of a huge fall of roof which resulted in the death of William Llew Davies, of Mount Lebanon, Treherbert. Four other men were seriously injured."—Western Mail," (Oct. 16th, 1919). FATAL PIT ROOF FALL.—Coroner's cri- ticism of Timbering. Wlliiam Henry, the manager, admitted that the place was not timbered all along at this place as there appeared to he such a strong rock top. The parting was used daily. The Coroner The place was evidently not timbered throughout as it should have been. We arc quite satisfied in saving this man lost his life through an accidental fall of roof,' yet it is a pity the timbering rule was not fully carried out. I don't say this would have prevented the fatality, as I can quite imagine this place being timbered from end to end, and then a sudden crush knocking it all out, but you would have had the satisfaction of knowing you had done all you could."—Western Mail (Octo- ber isth, 1919). Y- & d FIVE MINERS SLAIN EVERY DAY.- Scathing Comments -Little Else-on Ne- glect. 12,473 less men employed in 1018 than 1917, but 31 more deaths from acci- dents. III June, 1918, a mine manager, who pleaded guilty to some 40 to So contra- ventions of the act (contraventions which included failure to support a roof properly and failure to fence exposed machinery) was fined— £ 8 "—Daily Herald (October 18th, 1919). :¡: V In all parts of a roadway in which sets or trains consisting of three or more tubs are coupled or uncoupled, the roof and sides shall be systematically and adequate- ly supported, and in such parts and in all other parts of the roadway the roof and sides of which require to be supported, if props or bars are used as supports, such supports shall be set at such regular inter- vals and in-such manner as may be specified in the notice hereinafter mentioned. -Coa; Mines Act, 1911, Section 49, Sub-Section 3. :1. "SUPPORT OF ROOF AND SIDES.-illr. Walker has been much impressed by the system of support which is in force at Vic- toria Pit, Newbattle colliery. The roof and sides of all the roads from the pit bottoms to within a short distance of the working- faces are supported by arched steel girders set at regular distances apart. Between the webs of the girders 011 the main roads be- tween the pit bottom and the face, brick- work is built in, the side-roads being sup- ported by arched girders without brick- work. At the working face the roof is sup- ported by steel props set in a systematic manner and recovered as the face advanced. During the fi vc years ended December 31st, 1918, there has been no fatal accident due to fnlls of roof or side in this pit, whilst over one million an 1 a half tons of coal has been gotten. The depth of cover at the

Labour Notes.

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Labour Notes.

Workmen's Examiners. (Continued).…

Surrender of 140,600 Milcti…