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PRISONERS OF CONSCIENCE. J

BOLSHEVISM!

THE CAMPAICN ACAINST THE RUSSIANI…

IRISH SOLIDARITY.

I THE SIX-HOUR DAY. I

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I THE SIX-HOUR DAY. I I TO THE EDITOR. I Sir.—The six-hour day question for miners is one that has to be faced in all its pros and cons by those who are expected to bring it into working order. It must be clearly understood that the six hours a day will not remove the ban of unemployment and make room for tie re- turning soldiers, unless the miners get rid of some of the old customs now prevailing at the mines. It will be necessary to have a double shift, Or a shortening of the width of the work- ing-places in the coal faces, to find places for the returning soldiers. To me there is n2t much to be given away in any of the two customs mentioned. The shortening of the working face would, I consider, benefit the workmen, it would not be so laborious to carry the coal to the tram the roads would be closer to each other, the "goaf" would be packed better, and. a. greater amount of safety secured, the miner woutd have a greater amount of deadwork owing to the roadway travelling quicker. The reduc- tion of t-lie tion of the stalls, say, from 24 yards to 15 yards, would very soon make room to absorb the re- turning soldiers and give them places to work Ill. I notice that in some collieries the work- men have decided to withdraw the men who came into the mines since the war to make room for returning soldiers. This, in my opinion, is not a proper course to take. No doubt the Gov- ernment will encourage this kind of business be- cause to keep tho soldier unemployed will mean an expense upon the Government, but to keep the miners unemployed would cost the Govern- ment nothing, therefore, it is. the duty of the miners to do everything within reason to find places for the returning soldiers without doing any other workmen out of work. It must be con- sidered that quite a large number of the soldiers when they left the mines for the Army were mere boys who, after two, three and four years in the Army, have become men, and who will expect to get places accordingly. Then there is the question of piece work. We may as well face the issue straight. Unless an uniform rate of wages is first of all secured, it will mean a reduction in wages to the piece-workers, be- cause the present piece rate is cut so fine, that every hour counts in the economic contest, and it will be impossible for the pieceworker to earn as much in six hours as in eight hours. But even if a reduction in wages results, what is not in the pocket is on the back. The average life of a miner is 50 years, and the average life of a farmer is 70 years—why the difference P— Yoiil-s, C-te., I WM. WILLIAMS, Coed Ely Treasurer. I

I THE RINK MEETINGS._I

THE CRAFTSMEN AND THE M.F.C.B.…

Merthyr Trades-People

IHANDS OFF RUSSIA.

: ANOTHER COMPLAINT.I

Electric Theatre .

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