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A Legal Quibble.

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A Legal Quibble. A curious point was raised at Cefn Coed Po- lice Conn on Thursday, when summonses for alleged breaches of the Food Orders were down for hearing. At the outset it was stated that the defendant. T. A. Rowen, butcher, High- street, Cefn Coed, had been served with the summons in the name of W. Bowen, whereupon Mr. Washington Bowen, who prosecuted on he- half of the Vaynor and Benderyn Food Control Committee. ask;yl that the summons should he amended. T. A. Bowen was trading on the premise's ns W. Bowen. Mr. J. W. Iew- Mer- thyr, for the defence, stated that W. Bowen, son of T. A. Bowen, was on active service, and he submitted that the powers of amendment vested in the magistrates did not extend to the substitution of one defendant for another. The Bench upheld the contention of the defence, and the prosecution withdrew the summonses, the Cleric remarking that fresh summonses could be issued. be made in the House of Commons to obtain a clear statement on the point hen- referred to. NAVAL PRIZE MONEY Parliament has passed a Naval Prize Bill to authorise the distribution of the money realised on vessels captured under certain conditions among the officers and men of the Navy. During the debate on the measure reference was made to the proportions it has been the practice of the Admiralty to allocate to men of different ranks in paying out prize money. The Com- mander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleets gets 2,000 s hares, which is 400 times as much as an able, seaman receives. One member, Commander Bellairs. in commenting on the unfairness of the scale of payments of priw money to different ranks, added a point to his advice to the Ad- miralty to deal more liberally with the lower ranks in future by relating a story which, 1 think, is worth repeating. He said that in the old days of British naval activity a man of the lower ranks was discovered in the middle of a naval action on his knees apparently praying. He was asked by an officer who came upon him unexpectedly what lie was praying for, to which question the seaman replied saying that he was piaying that the bullets might be whacked out like prize-money, for if they were the bulk of them would go to the officers. SUBSIDISED DYE INDUSTRY. Parliament has voted a first instalment of £ 1,000,000 towards a total of £ 2.000,000 for the assistance of firms engaged in the produc- tion of dyes. It is the intention of the Board of Trade to lend £ 1,250,000 to firlll engaged in this business and to give "them £600.()(() for the purpose of extending their plant and build- ings, and to give them also £lr,o,lw.X) to be spent on research work. The profit arising out of the use of this money will fielong to the share-! holders and proprietors of the assisted concerns and not to the State. The State is going tol pay 40 per cent, of the total cost of the exten- sions of plant and buildings under this scheme and get nothing in return. In the course of the debate on the proposal 'one member mentioned the case of a company set on its feet by the Ministry of Munitions by similar methods to those now being applied to firms engaged in the production of dyes. The result in the case of the company in question was that a shareholder who had previously subscribed 6d. for a share had received in return 144 shares of tl each. GOLDEN AGE OF CAPITALISM. The general public have not the faintest idea as to the extent to which capitalist enterprise is being subsidised out of State funds. Munition firms, for example, have in many cases been al- lowed to extend their premises and increase their plant, the cost being deducted from the amount due to be paid by them on account of excess profits during a period of three years. It is pretended, of course, that the expenditure is necessary solely on account of war wmok, but this is far from being correct, Establishments have been brought teo date regardless of ex- pense, and in some cases railway sidings have been brought to the very door and premises ex- tended for the benefit of the future as well as to meet present requirements. In their most extravagant dreams of longed-for prosperity capitalists never dreamed of opportunities such as have come to them during this war. and they are making the most of them, but the Govern- ment that showers these benents at the cost of an unknown number of millions OJ1,.eapita1Íst,s. is going to leave the soldier's wife to get along as best she can on her 12/6 a week separation al- lowance. CONTRASTS IN IRELAND. The Government seems determined to s how, in startling contrast, its unfairness in dealing with different episodes connected with the Irish question. Mrs. Sheehey Skeffington, whose hus- band was murdered, is not allowed to return to her hoitie in Ireland, whilst Captain Bowen- Coulthurst. who ordered her husband to be shot but was judged guilty, but insane, has heen set free. The Nationalist Volunteers have been compelled to give up stores of arms long ago, whilst the so-called provisional Government of Ulster has not I)eeii dissolved, and the arms ac- cumulated for the purpose or reljellion against the State by the Ulster Volunteers still remain in their possession. No won(ier Ireland is in a condition of continual ferment. I I

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