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Political Notes

I The Visit of Soermus.

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I The Visit of Soermus. I WONDERFUL MUSIC AT THE RINK. I AUDIENCE OF OVER A THOUSAND. Soermus is delighted with Merthyr and its people; the Merthyr people demonstrated their delight at the visit of such an artiste as the leat Russian so rcll hy Öeir attend- ance at the Rink and so exuberantly at the end of each recital by the performer that to say that the delight is mutual and reciprocal is to be platitudinous. Yet what was it we applauded so loudly Not the technique, for an apprecia tion of that would depend upon a. training iz instrumentation that not one per cent. of us ba.f had. Certainly not technique. Did we appre ciate the musical message then of Bach? I am inclined to answer that we. did not, for the uyes- sage was couched in language too fluent for our halting speech; too poetic for our prosaic souls.. We but glimpsed dimly the inspiring uplift of the mighty melody as a child might feel the wondrousness of the ethic of the Sermon on tie Mount, yet fail to comprehend it because the knowledge of good and evil, the actuality of comparison is forbidden to the purity of the vir- gin mind and life of the child. And so one might try, 1\.<; I have tried this last four and twenty hours, to explain the psychology of Tues- day night, when over a thousand of us sat in ecstactic rapture the while Soermus' magic music bathed us in a holy atmosphere not of this earth. But try as one will the explanation eludes one. It is as though the greatness of the love and appreciation of Soermus for his splendid art had for a while opened to us doors in tHe soul, that closed, alas, too early and that left behind 'out a recollection of a land not as this land, of a life not an this life. A land of always sunshine, and sweetness, and broad vL"ta. and blue skies and splashing waves on golden sands; a life from which the horrors of this materially enwrapped life had been remorselessly carved off, a life in which love and brotherhood and sisterhood was the sovereign rule. For brief spells it were as though the future was opened unto us, and we saw the world that we would hasten—a world that sounds impossibly Utopian to the squalidly environed soul of to-day. William Morris' "News from Nowhere" was visualised to ua. and our hearts throbbed with delight, as for that brief space we knew the joys of an existence I so alien to this—an existence in which there might be Golden Dustmen witlio11* any incon- gruity. Who shall explain arL t?At does bhis; gruity. ill dare to criticise; for criticmm of that which. could do these things to us in the mass is but the folly that would rob a child of its be- lief in the fairies, and would give it nothing to console it* broken heart. I am unable to cri- ticise, I can only remember, and be pleased that I was of such an audience; an audience that for the most part was of the people. For after all, the marvel is that such a message should not be far above the masses, who have not had the op- portunity to develop their {esthetic nature; nay, whose very conditions of life are artificially so deoased in the mad fight of Capital for Profit, that the very seeds of the soul that bring forth such wonderful flowers as this of music, and its appreciation, are poisoned ere they are quickened into life. But though the soil be soured and the air poisoned, the sun of such music as was given to us on Tuesday can penetrate the poison and neutralise the acidity, and stir up the finer life that is but wanting the warmth to germin- ate and flower forth, giving to us if not a new earth, at all events an earth so radically differ- ent to that which we know that it might well be new. Soermus did that for us. The pity is that there are not a, hundred Scermuses to do it on a bigger scale, and reaching a greater public. Soermus, the master artiste, himself bowed in appreciation of the choral music rendered by the Penywern Male Voice Party, and, indeed. all that I have found it possible to express of Scermus' work is applicable in only a slightly lesser degree to the work that thev did. Their contributions were as artistic as the massed human voice singing the language of Eden can be. It is given to few vocalists to visualise music; and it is a faculty pMSesRoo by even fewer choirs, but the Penywern Choir reached that exalted pinnacle on Tuesday night. Than that none could give them greater praise. A.P.Y.

ILabour's Choice at Bedwellty.

Political Notes