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THE NEW REFORM ACT.

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THE NEW REFORM ACT. The new Reform Bill has at last be- come the law of the land. In other days the passing of this democratic measure would have aroused tremen- dous excitement throughout the coun- try but the experiences of the world- war has accustomed us to great challgAS-and what was once regarded as being only possible after long and bitter struggles, now slips into prac- tice with little more than a passing comment from the great public. It is most unfortunate for the pro- gressive forces of the country that the « alternative vote was taken from the Bill by the action of the House of Lords, supported at the last by the Unionists members of the House of Commons. This will mean that in single member constituencies, where three-cornered contests take place— and these contests will be far more numerous in the future than ever bo- fore—the member returned may well be representative of a minority of tho electors. The outstanding features of the Act are, the enfranchisement of women to the number of about six millions, the limit of age being fixed at 30 for un- married women, while married women of any age will be entitled to the vote. The age limit for males is 21, hut soldiers and sailors of 19 will receive the vote, and facilities for voting by post will be given to soldiers and sailors absent from the country on service. It is estimated that the total electorate will be increased from 8,500,000 in 1916 to a b out 16.500.000. The work of preparing the lists of voters wiilt now be proceeded with im'raediately throughout the country, and in all probability th^re will be an election some time in the summer.

YSTALYFENA PIT FATALITYI

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I YSTALYFERA NOTES.

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'-- - - - I iI LOCAL MUSICAL…

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U.S. TRANSPORT TORPEDOED.'

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