Hide Articles List

6 articles on this Page

GWAUHCAEGURWEN AND I.GWHGOBSE

Advertising

[ _DEMOCRATIC INVESTMENT.

Advertising

Advertising
Cite
Share

III I Genuine Bargains for all.  Our Annual  i ??? 1 ???J? C??? iI ??? ?M ? M ? i ti ? t'?t? now in progress. A few of the exceptional Bargains are appended below. 6 Silver and Brown Musquash Fur Coats, usually 15 guineas & 10 guineas now 7 gns. A few Coney Fur Coats to clear 73/6 | 1794 Tweed, Blanket, Astracan & Napp Coats, to clear at 5/- J 141 Navy Napp Coats, usually 52/6, 45/6 & 39/6 now 25/6 and 19/11 Black Wolf Muffs and Ties to clear 29/6 and 42/- set 34 Wine Velour Coats, usually 49/6 and 59/6 to clear at 29/11 natnrx 6 Siik Plush Coats, usually 4 guineas. to clear at 45/6 f 396 Assorted JBrown, Bottle Green and Grey Coats to clear at 19/11 Every Garment must be sold to make room for New Season's Goods. NOTE THE ADDRESSES— EVANS LASSAM, 19. Iliffh Street and 260, Oxford Street, Swansea The Old Established Firm. t. Our motto @o" VALUE FOR MONEY." .m Under the personal supervision of Mr. SHIRLEY G. LASSAlIl. "J tMj S 'St A Fr; ppgs ?F?????n?'P ? M K  Mt  Sc:  m wtw f?)r?  lavender ?s!s?????????? c § ??????'???? oacneTj_ Amongst the 21 charming varieties of || FRIPP'S I TOILET SOAP | M you will be sure to find your favourite perfume, || and of these FRIPP'S SWEET LAVENDER s calls for special mention for its faithful <|\ Sod- rendering of this dainty Old English perfume. m As a souvenir we will send to the first 1000 g Sp applicants quite free a dainty sachet containing real lavender. Simply write a postcard W^ cC: addressed as below, and be sure < to add your w M dealer's name and address. M w CHRISTR. THOMAS & BROS. LTD.. E1^x3 186. BROAD PLAIN, BRISTOL. F 16 Public Notices. RURAL DISTRICT OF PONT ARDA WE. Garden Allotments: Cultivation 1 of Land Order, 1917. THIS ORDER was extended to the j Rural District. of Pontarda-we early in last year, and was intended as a means to meet the demand for small allotments, and thus increase the crops available for consumption by the people. The powers of the Order should not be used, as far as possible, to inter- fere with land which is being already FULLY CULTIVATED, but in prao- tice it may be generally assumed, in1 the present national emergency, that much of the grass land could be more i fully cultivated in growing potatoes and other vegetables. Care must be taken not to cut up old pastures usual- J ly grazed by milking cows. Any un- occupied land may be taken without I payment in the form of rent to the Owner, and land which is occupied can be taken with the consent of the War Agricultural Committee of the County. The rent payable for such occupied land will be at the rate per acre paid to the Owner by the tenant at the time of entry by the Council. As far as can be ascertained, the Order will expire at the end of 1919, but there is every prospect that the term will be extended, and the Garden Associa- tions are strongly urging the Board of Agriculture in this direction. The Order is only directly intended to make provision for temporary allot- ments to meet the present, emergency, But it would be Open to the allotment- holders or their, associations to nego- rt tiate, when the Order expires, directly with the Owners of the land, or through the Parish Council for a further tenancy of occupation. In normal times intending allotment- holders very rightly considered the economic side before taking up an allotment. In the present crisis the question whether an allotment will pay to cultivate is not the main point. Every man who, by his spare-time labour, is able to cultivate a new allot- ment, is not only assuring for himself and family a sufficient supply of vegetable food, but he is directly help- ing to win and end the war. The efforts of allotment-holders last season freed a large number of ships for other pur- poses M vital national importance. Incidentally, the allotment-holder is helping the poorer classes, many of whom are physically incapable of till- ing the ground, to obtain his vegetable food in increased quantities and at a cheaper rate. This season the District Council most strongly urge the Garden and Allotment Associations TO DOUBLE THEIR EFFORTS, and they may rely on the close co-operation of the members of the Council and the officials. Other advantages of the Order may may be stated thus:— 1—It gives the simplest and quick- est procedure for taking laDd compul- scfrilv, or by agreement. 2-It enables the Council to let any land so taken by a Garden or Allot- ment Society fothe use of its mem- bers. 3-It gives the Council a grant of £ 2 per acre from the Board of Agricul- ture which may be expended in adapV. ing the land for cultivation. 4-The allotment-holder's rent will usually be the rent paid for the land by the Council with the cost of fenc- ing (if any), and towards such cost the grant referred to may be taken. 5-The allotments under the Order are deemed to be land held for the Crown and therefore exempt from local rates. 6-Any trespass or damage to crops on these allotments is each an offence under the Defence of the Realm Regulations. 7—The compensation for damage by cutting up the land will not fall on the allotment-holder but will be paid to the owner or occupier, at the ex- piration of the Order, by the Board of Aerieulture. WYNDHAM LEWIS, Clerk to the Council, Council Offices, Pontardawe. 3rd January, 1918.

IBRYNAMMAN -

Advertising