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oil NEAREST AND DEAREST ENEMIES.

GE^.YUNY'd FOOD DAYS.|

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GE^.YUNY'd FOOD DAYS. I QUESTION OF FODDER AIsD MEAT SUPPLIES. The* following despatch has been re- ceived trom Mr. H. Warner Allen, the special correspondent of the British press with the French armies. :— If tho blockade of Germany is to be rationally reinforced, with a view to its I produeing its maximum effect, it is clear that the internal situation of the enemy countries must be taken into considera- tion, and that, as far as possible, they must be deprived of all chance of obtain- ing supplies of those articles which they more especially need. For this resaon the economic position of Germany has at the present moment a special interest and importance. The well-known decree of October 28, 1915, fixed the following "food days" for the German Empire :-Two days without meat, two days without fatty substances, one day with meat, but without pork, and tvvodays of liberty. The exact mean- ing of this decree can only be understood by an examination of the .skps taken by the German Government to keep up the supply of meat. The whole question turns on the matter of fodder. SCARCITY OF FODDER. In times of peace Germany imports 40 per cent. of its fodder, and it is the scarcity of fodder that has produced the present scarcity of meat. The only real relief to the situation could come from the outside, a.nd it is Lhis relief that British blockade must prevent. The German Government is eiio deavouririg to purchase at any price the caltie food that it needs so sorely, as well as those fatty substances, such as butter, lord, aiid margarine, the scarcity of which has produced so great all effect throughout the Empire. Maize, oilcake, and best sugar refuse will fetch almost ally price in Gerauny. and it is mainly through Holland that they reach the Central Empire?. The British Government has consented, in return for promises of a distinctly ague nature, to allow the regular impor- tation of such articles into Belgium, pro- vided that such, imports do not exceed the normal peace average. This supply of cattle i'ood will enable the enemy to breed and fatten the Belgian cattle, and will provide Germany with very consider- able resources in meat. She has already made use of the Belgian sugar manu- factories, and is using the molasses and the beet refuse for the food of her cattle and horses. A ;other considerable product of which the Germans are badly in noed is bread. In this matter the blockade appears to hold good, and the onlv way out of the difficulty that the Germans have so far discovered is to buy In Roumania at cx- orbitant prices. RIOTS. The German newspapers, as a rule, deny the riots which have taken place in Germany on account of the dearness of living, but letters sent to prisoners or captured on their persons give abundant proof that they have been violent riots and there are many bankruptcies, includ- ing that the famous Luitpold brasseries. A letter sent to a prisoner, concealed in a bottle, describes the Chemnitz riots. People there were particularly incensed at the scarcity of butter, and for nearly a. week; they spent their time in pillaoing le shops, throwing stones through the windows, and hurling b-Lift-r and eggs into tho TO ad. Fnally the firemen were called out, and turned their hose on the crowd, but the rioters cut the hose and assau lted the police. "In fact," says the writer of the letter, "we have war at home rs well as abroad."—Press Associa- tion War Special. j —————

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PONTARDAWE GUARDIANS -I

MORE RESERVED TRADES.!

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YSTALYFERA NOTES.

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