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SOUTH WALES MINERS I

AGAIXST THE DOCTOR. I

WAR MOTOR AMBULANCESI

THE NEW AUSTRALIAN HIGH COMMISSIONER.…

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WHAT POLICEWOMEN ARE DOING.

I MILLIONAIRE AND HIS WEALTH.…

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I FERRET ATTACKS WOMAN. I

The Caravan of

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us ?" demanded the Frenchman in his I own tongue. I "No," asserted the man with the ear- rings. "There is no one on this deck at all." "Didn't I tell you," said Perard, with an undercurrent of annoyanoe in his tone., "that under no circumstancea were you j to speak to me, or let any one know that I knew you, on board this ship ?" "Yes, you did, but I had to see you." "Well, what is it, then? What do you want ?" •'Money," was the laconic reply, and this monosyllable seemed sufficient to arouse all the temper that Perard held dormant, for he burst into a volley of harsh oaths and interiections. "Money, money all the time! You come to me and demand money. You pro- mised me the last time I gave you money that you would not pester me again for at least a month. I gave you five hun- dred francs on the day before we sailed, and that was to run you until we got to Paris; and here you are again, three days out, wanting more. What do you do with it?" "What do I do with it? Lost it gambl- ing," sullenly asserted the man with the earrings. "Gambling, eh! Well, that's not mv fault. See here, Goliano! You'll get no more money from me until we get off this boat, and then you'll get just enough to take you to Paria. I'm going now and I don't want you to bother me any more. "Going, eh? Are you, my fine bird?" suddenly snarled his ompanion, and I lifted myself in time to see him reach the Frenchman by the arm, and whirl him round, while a menacing fist shook itself in the air. "You'll not give me money, eh, when I ask for it. Well. you will. You've got to. You can't help vourself. You're playing for millions of francs. You ca.n't get it without me. because I'm the only witness to make those milliona good. You'll give me the paltry money I need when I want it. Otherwise, when the time comes, you'll get not a word out of me, and w here would vou be then? Bah! Nowhere." He snapped his fingers con- temptuously under Perard's nose, and the latter drew back and tried to mollify him. "Be reasonable, Goliano," he said. "Be reasonable. This takes time and a lot of money. We can't put our scheme across in any other way, but I can't pour gold pieces out to you like a millionaire when I haven't got them." "You can-you will!" angrily retorted the man with the earrings. "You, the Count Perard, are to make millions while I get a pill try forty or fifty thousand francs and my expenses. I'll see to it that my expenses will be just what I want and not a centime less. You come across with the money, or before we leave this ship, I'll go and tell that old man that His fiery temper had broken all bounds and his voice lifted itself, reckless of who might hear. 'I "You fool," growled the Frenchman, are you crazy ? Shut up, I tell you! Do you want everybody on the ship to hear your blabbing mouth? How much do you want ?" "Oh, so you will pay eh?" I heard the man with earrings sneer. "How much do I want? I want another five hundred irancs, here and now." Apparently Perard balked at this sum, for Goliano made a different attack. "You give me the five hundred francs, he said, "and I won't ask you for more money until after we have been in Paris for two weeks. Don't be afraid. I'll keep my word this time." There was a minute's silence, a rustling of papers, a match was struck and then I hei,rd Perard gav, wifh an oath "There, take it, but no more, mind you He started to walk away, and then as if

GERMAN FOOD RIOTS.

JUDGED BY THE NEWSPAPERS.

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