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iNI'N ^DOI.-I

I ——— IWOMAN'S BRITTLE BONES.

MR C. MEUDWY DAVIES I

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PRIZE POEM-I

"Y MOCHYN DU." I

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SAW THE FALKLAND FIGHT. I

rWHY MR A. HENDERSON I II

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WHY MR A. HENDERSON I I CRTS COMPULSION. AN "ABSOLUTE MILITARY NECESSITY." i j ——— Mr Arthur Henderson( President of the Board of Education) sends us a copy of a long letter he has addressed to has constituents of Barnard Castle, in which he explains his attitude on the compulsion question. "If circumstances should arise which make it nekess.,Irv for me to seek re- election," he says, "I shall confidently appeal to my constituents to support the Governm-ent, because I believe 1 that they. like myself, are convinced that to-day there is only one task for all of us, and that is to win the war. He says that he approached the sub- ject of compulsion as a convinced sup- porter of the voluntary system, but when Lord Derby's report was pre- sented, even the strongest supporter was forced to admit that though from first to last six million men had offered themselves, there still remained a sub- stantial number of single men. eligible for military service, whom the volun- tary system had failed to secure. He proceeds:— "My opisions have not changed. but thev have been overborne by the con- i viction that some measure of com- pulsion is required on grounds of ab- solute military necessity. J found it impossible to resist tie contusion that unless the Bill were introduced and passed we could not continue the war with any prospect of either a sucess- ful or speedy termination. "I do not see how any man can set his opinion on a military question against the conclusion of Lord Kitchener and the General Staff, on whom res-ts responsibility for conduct- ing the war." Mr Henderson mentions that he realises that thousands in all parts of the country, while admitting the mili- tary necessity fire concerned as to the effects which the Bill may have on labour, and, in particular, as to the possible introduction of industrial com- pulsion. On this point he thinks that the safe guards introduced by the Government, especially that which bars the possibility of industrial com- pulsion, are so definite that the Bill ought to receive the general support of organised labour.

TWO GERMAN SPIES HANGED BYI,…

SOLDIERS SMOKE IX EEfr

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