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iNI'N ^DOI.-I

I ——— IWOMAN'S BRITTLE BONES.

MR C. MEUDWY DAVIES I

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PRIZE POEM-I

"Y MOCHYN DU." I

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SAW THE FALKLAND FIGHT. I

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SAW THE FALKLAND FIGHT. INTERESTING CHAT WITH OFFICER AT SWANSEA. A unique experience has been that of Mr. R. G. Jones, a native of Liverpool, and mate aboard the ss. Tynemead, now a.t Swansea, discharging wheat for Messrs Weaver and Co. On the occasion of the great Falklands naval battle Mr. Jones was mate aboard the Drummuire, bound for San Francisco from Swansea with anthracite coal. When sixty miles east of Cape Horn a sus- picious-looking vessel was seen on the horizon, and on her coming up found to to be the German cruiser Leipzig, which had been detailed off by Admiral Von Spee, the commodore of the German I squadron^ to capture the Drummuire. The latter was taken in tow by the Leipzig and proceeded 60 milea to Picton Islands where her cargo—"a veritable godsend to the Germans said Mr. Joiie,-was trans- ferred to aai accompanying lighter, and the crew to a German hospital ship. Several chaa-ges of dynamite were then placed in the Drummuire, which was afterwards blown up. Some idea of the feelings of the Ger- mans before the fight can be gathered from a conversation, here related by Mr. Jones, which he had with Admiral Von Spee, in which the latter in a boastful and arrogant manner avowed his inten- tion of taking the Falkland Islands after the Drummuire had been destroyed. '•There may be some rats in there, Ad- miral, don't you think so," said Mr. Jones; but Ven Spee pooh poohed the idea; and, sure enough, after the trad er had been disposed of the German fleet, consisting of the Scharnhorst, Gneisenau. Leipzig, Dresden, and Nurnberg, made straight for the Falklands. On nearing the Falklands, a ship came out and be^tn to go in circles round the German Fleet, coming in nearer each time. "A decoy," thought the English- man, a.n.d Von Spee directed his ships to make for the vessel. On nearing her, other wisps of smoke we.re noticed quickly coming nearer, and then the shock for the German feelings, for the whole fleet turned about and attempted to make off. Too late, however, Admiral Sturdee had caught the Germans napping and the fight was in full view of those aboard the hospital ship. Short work was —history tells—made of the Germans. The last order given aboard Von Spec's flagship could be distinctly heard. It was "All save yourselves." Whilst the fight was in progress, Mr Jones l assured the captainl of the hospital that he would not be fired on, saying that those in charge of the British warships werfe not German captains, and that so long as the Red Cross flag flew at the top of the mast not a shot would come their way. Whilst on board this vessel, the mate as the only Englishman, was given black bread and dirty coffee day after day, whilst those who declared themselves Americans were treated much differently. All his possessions, save the clothes he stood in, were taken from him. Running short of coal and provisions, the hospital ship put in at St. Antonia, where the crew of the Drummuire were landed. Reaching Buenos Ayrea. Mr. Jones said he had the first square meal for thirty days.

rWHY MR A. HENDERSON I II

TWO GERMAN SPIES HANGED BYI,…

SOLDIERS SMOKE IX EEfr

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