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-Sunday Concerts at the Pavilion.

I.I I STRIKE AT THE EBBW VALE…

HOW TO MEET YEAR'S WAR BILL.…

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I" Change " at Ystalyfera.

r MILITARY BILL PASSES

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QUESTION OF GUARANTEE .FUND.

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Mr. S. Firmev took his seat as the new Labour member for North-West Staffs .in place off the late Mr. A. Stanley. A worker who appeared before the Metropolitan Munitions Tribunal stated that he had no fewer tlia-ri 15 Army re- jection forms. Thie representatives of an iron company said that they were so badly pushed for men that they could not afford to discharge anybody. "Just now," he added, "we have men sent batk from the trench es because we are. so be- hind with tke Government work." General Owen Thomas {&ai's the "Star") is laying up claims to this country's gratitude. He was very largely instrumental in raising Wales's national army for the present war, and now he has given his son-the brave young fellow who has just been killed at the front. General Thomas began his busy career as a boy-farmer in his native Anglesea. Before he took to soldiering he organised local labour movements. In those days Owen Thomas was an anti-militarist and an out-and-out pacifist. But one day he realised the fact that the labouring classes stood in need of physical train- ing, so he sacrificed his prejudices and formed the labourers into companies of volunteers. When, therefore, the Boer War broke out the ex-farmer was the very man to make Wales rise to the occasion. His trained farm lads became the nucleus of a splendid regi- ment which he was allowed to call "the Prince of Wales Light Horse." With that force, 1,300 strong, the then Colonel Thomas fought. brilliantly in South Africa. A man who claimed wages in lieu of I notice from a firm of boot manufacturers at Northampton was said to be the only one in his room who had not attested. I and that. his fellow workers had threatened to strike unless he were dis- charged. The firm were forced into the action they took. but matters had since been arranged. Speaking at a. London Restaurant, Mr. Horatio Bottomley aaid out of a hundred German fubmarines which set out ten months ago to harass our Navy and mer- cantile marine, 88 lay now at the bottom of the sea. The censor seemed to think that if they talked about hese things they were giving information to the enemy.

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