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TRADE UNIONISM AND COMPULSION.

,.I iSIR ALFRED YEA AND NAY.

SAFEGUARDS AND STRIKES I

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SAFEGUARDS AND STRIKES I Good progress has been made this week with amendments to the Military Service No. 2 Bill, and it is plain that by the time the measure becomes law all risk of its being used for purposes of industrial conscription will be eliminated. This will make the measure more palatable to the Miners' Federation and other trade unions, but it will not entirely remove their objections. What it will do, however, is to kill the foolish talk of a strike indulged in by some of the younger and less experienced miners' delegates. Recent national strikes have been very successful, and it accounts for the be- lief of some people that it is an II offensive method that cannot suffer de- feat. However, a national strike to achieve an industrial end by calling in the State as arbitrator is one thing, a strike to break a political measure is another thing. The latter is as certain of a failure as the former has hitherto proved of success. The whole is greater than the part., and no trade union, however strong, would survive a conflict with the executive of the State in wartime. The over- whelming weight of public opinion would be with the Government. It is argued by some miners, in view of the last strike and the failure of the Munitions Act, that public opinion does not count. We think that is a profound mistake. Moreover, we are oonvinced that a majority of the rank- and-file of the trade unions are in favour of the present Bill, while many of those who are against it are not so strongly opposed that they would carry opposition to the length of im- perilling the ultimate victory of the Allies, and the safetv of their relatives in the trenches. Thus a trade union which called a strike would be sub- ject to extraordinary pressure from without and disintegrating influence from within, and no working-class or- ganisation could survive that. These are objections to a strike policy on the ground of expediency, but there is a far greater one of principle. Trade unionists are democrats, and demo- crats submit to laws whether they like them or not. This is the very essence of the democratic method, and we of the working classes whose en- tire hope hinges on the 'suooess of democracy, ought to be the very last to deal democracy a blow.

I Ynisraeudw Pastor Leaves.

IYSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL AUDIT.I

FOUR MONTI? . BROKEN I BACK.

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CONSCRIPTION OF WEALTH. I

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YSTALYFERA NOTES.

YSTRADGYNLAIS NOTES. I

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YSTALYFERA NOTES.