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"BARN Y BRODYR."

Mr. J. Hugh Edwards, M.P and…

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SENGiiENYDO IN PARLIAMENT.

SIR MARCHANT WILLIAMSI

[No title]

SAFETY IN THE MINES. I

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SAFETY IN THE MINES. I EDUCATING THE COLLIER. TREFOREST PRINCIPAL'S IDEA In his inaugural address to the Stu- dents' Association of the Treforest School of Minos, Principal Knox em- phasised the need for technical educa- tion in the mining industry. The de- velopment of technology in South Wales had not kept pace with the de- velopment of the mining industry. De- spite its outstanding importance in the coalfields of the world the facilities for mining education had been far inferior to those provided in other coalfields. A comparison in the mining colleges in France and Belgium, in Germany, in the United States, and in our Colonies would serve to emphasise the need for the Trefore.st School in South Wales. There was a prejudice against uni- versity trained engineers—a prejudice which had been expressed by one emi- nent writer in a comparison between English and American systems of edu- cation "that in England the university graduated a man into a top hat, where- as in America it graduated him into overalls." TECHNICAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS A great difficulty, however, confront- ed teachers in the higher branches of technology in the lack of suitable pre- paratory training on the pan; of stu- dents entering for technical courses. This training could not be conferred by purely evening classes. There was a pressing need for junior day technical schools to broaden the training of stu- dents for the higher branches of tech- nology. Such a technical training could not be conferred by the existing types of secondary schools, providing another route and training for those who con- templated passing directly into the in- dustrial organisation, fitting them with higher ideals and better developed minds, capable of taking a definite specialised part in their vocational work The same conditions with respect to age, standard of entry, and hours of study as those pertaining to second- ary schools might be established. The foundation of the curriculum should be science and mathematics, combined with the study of literature, history and the principles of citizenship to en- able the student not only to earn a living but to live well. The co-ordination between the ele- mentary schools and technological in- stitutions could thus be obtained on lines parallel with those existing be- tween the secondary schools and the university, with the diff erenee that the student would only attend the school for six or seven months in the year, II the other five or six months being spent in the mine or workshop. Students i showing special aptitude for technical work might be assisted by maintenance scholarship. to attend the full-time courses at the technical college or uni- versity. In England and Wales less than 5 per cent. of the children passed from elementary into secondary and techni- cal courses, as compared with 65 per cent. in the large German cities. This was due chiefly to the cost of higher education, which had to a great extent been the monopoly of the well-to-do classes. Such a scheme as Principal Knox had suggested would make it possible, he thought, for the poorest students to reach the highest rung of the educational ladder, and to become a valuable asset to the industry of the nation SPECIALISATION. The Treforest School was the first at- tempt in this country to found a. techni- cal school not only in connection with the industry, but as a necessary part of the industrial organisation. The de- velopment of the surface equipments of collieries was rapidly making it impera- tive that the colliery managers should superintend only the underground operations, leaving to specialists the control of the surface plant. The Tre- forest courses had been designed with a view to future specialisation in the mining industry, and it waa hoped th&t in the near future the mining engineer, surveyor, chemist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer should take a share of the responsibilities now borne almost entirely by the colliery mama- ger. With the association of the Tre- forest School with the University Col- lege, and possibly other similar institu- tions, a. highly specialised training was open to every student. The need for research was emphasised by a generous provision of the Mining Board for that item of work, and by the establishment or research fellowships facilities would he given in the near future to capable men to enable them to undertake the solution of the many problems affect- ing the mining industry. It was im- possible, however, to train a mining man in the technical college or univer- sity unless he was in close touch with everyday colliery practice. On the other hand, it was not pos- sible to train a man in the mine with- out the added help of technology. THE LONG VIEW. It paid in colliery managemnt to take the "long view" of things. This was becoming general in this ooalfield. The magnificent surface equipment of collieries to-day would have caused considerable consternation to capital ists a few years ago, but there was no doubt that these enabled a saving to (Continued at bottom of next column-)

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SAFETY IN THE MINES. I

"BARN Y BRODYR."