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THE PONTARDAWE STRIKE

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THE PONTARDAWE STRIKE There are m.igns of the end of the Pontardawe strike, and it has lasted now three weeks. We think that the question at issue is not so thorny and Complicated that if both sides got together they could not by frank dis- cussion and mutual concession end the dispute. On the employers' side there have been deplorable tactlessness, and a lamentable failure to see the humon side of the point of dispute. The pro- motion of a junior over the head of a senior was a wantonly provocative breach of custom, and men much less spirited than those at Pontardawe would not be slow to resent it. When the suggestion was made that the two men should compete with one another for the job, insult was added to injury. Messrs. Gilbertson are, or should be, keen enough employers to know that since the days of the old "bell-horse" dodge, trade unions and trade unionists the world over have resolutely set them- selves against the idea of internal com- petition, that has the sole effect of forcing down wages, and ruining the bodies of the workers in order to main- tain or increase profits. The workers nowadays will not submit to be treated as machines, to be run at the highest speed and worked at their fullest capacity for a given period, and then scrapped. Time was when they might have tamely acquiesced in such a sys- tem, but it is a time that has gone, never to return. The dispute then, although sym- bolised by a single individual, involves a general principle, and that one of first-rate importance. But the problem it presents is by no means insoluble, and it can be solved, temporarily at least, by the exercise of goodwill and common senee. It will never be solved. while either side retains petty little notions of personal dignity, or advan- ces cavilling points about procedure, forms of representation, and fancied or real breaches of rules, that in any case were meant to heal not widen breaches between employers, and em- ployees. The "Spoilt Tom" spirit is what is expected from ohildren in a game, but it comes very ill from em- ployers engaged in the serious business of life and industry. L«t the Messrs. Gilbertson tackle this dispute in ¡ Le spirit of men earnest and eager to bring a disa&ivous dispute to an end, and they may do something to preset 'e the reputation for fairness which :r h 1 'I I! champions in the T.ibernl newspr.p. 's > c!ajr? for th m. 0"herwit?) they may the rcputrrf^i, and souiel'irng more iAiij p wj--r rs.

LABOUR AND WELSH ! I NATIONALITY.j

GLAMORGAN MAGISTRATES.I

MRS. PANKHURST'S "DOUBLE."

ABERCRAVE NOTES I

I DULAIS VALLEY CHAT. I

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MR LLOYD GEORGE ON NATIONAL…

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